Routine acid decalcification of bone marrow samples can preserve DNA for FISH and CGH studies in metastatic prostate cancer

R. S D Brown, J. Edwards, J. W. Bartlett, C. Jones, A. Dogan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Production of paraffin-section material from tissue samples that contain bone requires decalcification. Techniques such as acidic decalcification or EDTA chelation are suitable methods. Acid decalcification is generally quicker than EDTA chelation but studies have suggested that it may result in hydrolysis of DNA. Here we show that limited acid decalcification (less than 24 hr) in 5% formic acid can preserve DNA sufficient for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and that prolonged 10% formic acid decalcification results in failure of FISH and only limited retrieval of DNA for CGH studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-115
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry
Volume50
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

formic acid
Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Prostatic Neoplasms
Bone Marrow
Edetic Acid
Acids
DNA
Paraffin
Hydrolysis
Bone and Bones

Keywords

  • Bone marrow
  • Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)
  • Decalcification
  • DNA
  • Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)
  • Formic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Routine acid decalcification of bone marrow samples can preserve DNA for FISH and CGH studies in metastatic prostate cancer. / Brown, R. S D; Edwards, J.; Bartlett, J. W.; Jones, C.; Dogan, A.

In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, Vol. 50, No. 1, 2002, p. 113-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, R. S D ; Edwards, J. ; Bartlett, J. W. ; Jones, C. ; Dogan, A. / Routine acid decalcification of bone marrow samples can preserve DNA for FISH and CGH studies in metastatic prostate cancer. In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry. 2002 ; Vol. 50, No. 1. pp. 113-115.
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