Rotating platform knees did not improve patellar tracking: A prospective, randomized study of 240 primary total knee arthroplasties

Mark W. Pagnano, Robert T. Trousdale, Michael J. Stuart, Arlen D. Hanssen, David J. Jacofsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Scopus citations

Abstract

Renewed interest in mobile-bearing total knee replacement designs has been generated by the concept of self alignment and the suggestion that those designs can accommodate small mismatches in the rotational position of the tibial and femoral components. Self alignment might improve patellar tracking, decrease the prevalence of lateral retinacular release and postoperative patellar tilt or subluxation, improve knee flexion, and improve patellofemoral function during daily activities such as stair climbing. This prospective randomized study of 240 patients used a single posterior-stabilized femoral component and included three groups of 80 patients: an all-polyethylene group, a modular metal-backed group, and a rotating platform tibia group. The prevalence of lateral retinacular release was 3.8% in each group. The prevalence of patellar tilt was 5% (all-polyethylene group), 7% (modular metal-backed group), and 11% (rotating platform group). Preoperative motion was not significantly different and both the 3-month flexion (112°, 110°, and 108°) and 1-year flexion (116°, 117°, and 115°) were not significantly different among the all-polyethylene, modular metal-backed, and rotating platform groups, respectively. Preoperative stair climbing scores were not significantly different and both the 3-month (38, 41, and 35 points) and 1-year (44, 46, and 42 points) scores were not significantly different. In this prospective randomized study, the rotating platform knee design did not decrease the prevalence of lateral retinacular release or patellar tilt or subluxation and did not increase knee flexion or improve stair climbing ability at 3 months or at 1 year postoperatively when compared with a posterior-stabilized, fixed-bearing knee.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-227
Number of pages7
JournalClinical orthopaedics and related research
Issue number428
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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