Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multiple myeloma remains incurable despite the use of high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation and the introduction of novel agents with high response rates. The use of an uncontaminated stem cell graft and the presence of a graft-versus-myeloma effect led to the use of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in myeloma, and it has been part of the therapeutic armamentarium for more than a decade. Early results were discouraging due to high transplantation-related mortality and high rates of graft-versus-host disease. More recently, better supportive care, increasing experience with this modality and its complications, use of reduced-intensity conditioning regimens, and its use earlier in the course of disease have led to improved outcomes. Patients with high-risk genetic and biochemical features do poorly with conventional therapies, and allogeneic transplantation offers the potential for long-term disease control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-106
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Hematologic Malignancy Reports
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

Stem Cell Transplantation
Multiple Myeloma
Transplants
Homologous Transplantation
Graft vs Host Disease
Molecular Biology
Stem Cells
Therapeutics
Transplantation
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma. / Kumar, Shaji K.

In: Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports, Vol. 3, No. 2, 04.2008, p. 99-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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