Robotic vs. open cystectomy: How length-of-stay differences relate conditionally to age

Kassem Faraj, Yu Hui H. Chang, Matthew R. Neville, Gail Blodgett, David A. Etzioni, Elizabeth B Habermann, Paul E. Andrews, Erik P Castle, Mitchell R Humphreys, Mark D. Tyson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The length-of-stay (LOS) benefit of minimally invasive cystectomy varies in the published literature, potentially because of subgroup effects. Here, we investigated the effect of minimally invasive cystectomy on LOS among different age groups. Methods and materials: Adult patients who underwent cystectomy (open or minimally invasive) from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2016, were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate the adjusted association between the surgical approach and LOS after stratifying patients by age (40–64, 65–79, and ≥80 years). A sensitivity analysis was performed after multiple imputation by using age as a continuous variable with a third-order polynomial term. Results: Of the 5,561 patients identified, 640 underwent minimally invasive cystectomy and 4,921 had open cystectomy. The unadjusted analysis showed that minimally invasive cystectomy was associated with a shorter mean LOS compared with the open approach (8.0 vs. 9.7 days; P < 0.001). The predicted difference in LOS between the 2 approaches was 0.72 days (95% confidence interval (CI), −0.28 to 1.72; P = 0.16) for patients aged 40 to 64 years, 1.48 days (95% CI, 0.73–2.23; P < 0.001) for 65 to 79 years, and 2.56 days (95% CI, 0.84–4.29; P = 0.01) for ≥80 years favoring the minimally invasive approach. The sensitivity analysis did not materially change the results. Conclusions: Older patients may derive more LOS benefit from minimally invasive approaches than younger patients. Given the greater expense associated with the minimally invasive approach, an age-adapted strategy to using this technology may be reasonable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalUrologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Cystectomy
Robotics
Length of Stay
Confidence Intervals
Quality Improvement
Linear Models
Age Groups
Databases
Technology

Keywords

  • Bladder cancer
  • Cystectomy
  • Length of stay
  • Robotic surgery procedures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Urology

Cite this

Robotic vs. open cystectomy : How length-of-stay differences relate conditionally to age. / Faraj, Kassem; Chang, Yu Hui H.; Neville, Matthew R.; Blodgett, Gail; Etzioni, David A.; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Andrews, Paul E.; Castle, Erik P; Humphreys, Mitchell R; Tyson, Mark D.

In: Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Faraj, Kassem ; Chang, Yu Hui H. ; Neville, Matthew R. ; Blodgett, Gail ; Etzioni, David A. ; Habermann, Elizabeth B ; Andrews, Paul E. ; Castle, Erik P ; Humphreys, Mitchell R ; Tyson, Mark D. / Robotic vs. open cystectomy : How length-of-stay differences relate conditionally to age. In: Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations. 2019.
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abstract = "Objectives: The length-of-stay (LOS) benefit of minimally invasive cystectomy varies in the published literature, potentially because of subgroup effects. Here, we investigated the effect of minimally invasive cystectomy on LOS among different age groups. Methods and materials: Adult patients who underwent cystectomy (open or minimally invasive) from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2016, were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate the adjusted association between the surgical approach and LOS after stratifying patients by age (40–64, 65–79, and ≥80 years). A sensitivity analysis was performed after multiple imputation by using age as a continuous variable with a third-order polynomial term. Results: Of the 5,561 patients identified, 640 underwent minimally invasive cystectomy and 4,921 had open cystectomy. The unadjusted analysis showed that minimally invasive cystectomy was associated with a shorter mean LOS compared with the open approach (8.0 vs. 9.7 days; P < 0.001). The predicted difference in LOS between the 2 approaches was 0.72 days (95{\%} confidence interval (CI), −0.28 to 1.72; P = 0.16) for patients aged 40 to 64 years, 1.48 days (95{\%} CI, 0.73–2.23; P < 0.001) for 65 to 79 years, and 2.56 days (95{\%} CI, 0.84–4.29; P = 0.01) for ≥80 years favoring the minimally invasive approach. The sensitivity analysis did not materially change the results. Conclusions: Older patients may derive more LOS benefit from minimally invasive approaches than younger patients. Given the greater expense associated with the minimally invasive approach, an age-adapted strategy to using this technology may be reasonable.",
keywords = "Bladder cancer, Cystectomy, Length of stay, Robotic surgery procedures",
author = "Kassem Faraj and Chang, {Yu Hui H.} and Neville, {Matthew R.} and Gail Blodgett and Etzioni, {David A.} and Habermann, {Elizabeth B} and Andrews, {Paul E.} and Castle, {Erik P} and Humphreys, {Mitchell R} and Tyson, {Mark D.}",
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T2 - How length-of-stay differences relate conditionally to age

AU - Faraj, Kassem

AU - Chang, Yu Hui H.

AU - Neville, Matthew R.

AU - Blodgett, Gail

AU - Etzioni, David A.

AU - Habermann, Elizabeth B

AU - Andrews, Paul E.

AU - Castle, Erik P

AU - Humphreys, Mitchell R

AU - Tyson, Mark D.

PY - 2019/1/1

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N2 - Objectives: The length-of-stay (LOS) benefit of minimally invasive cystectomy varies in the published literature, potentially because of subgroup effects. Here, we investigated the effect of minimally invasive cystectomy on LOS among different age groups. Methods and materials: Adult patients who underwent cystectomy (open or minimally invasive) from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2016, were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate the adjusted association between the surgical approach and LOS after stratifying patients by age (40–64, 65–79, and ≥80 years). A sensitivity analysis was performed after multiple imputation by using age as a continuous variable with a third-order polynomial term. Results: Of the 5,561 patients identified, 640 underwent minimally invasive cystectomy and 4,921 had open cystectomy. The unadjusted analysis showed that minimally invasive cystectomy was associated with a shorter mean LOS compared with the open approach (8.0 vs. 9.7 days; P < 0.001). The predicted difference in LOS between the 2 approaches was 0.72 days (95% confidence interval (CI), −0.28 to 1.72; P = 0.16) for patients aged 40 to 64 years, 1.48 days (95% CI, 0.73–2.23; P < 0.001) for 65 to 79 years, and 2.56 days (95% CI, 0.84–4.29; P = 0.01) for ≥80 years favoring the minimally invasive approach. The sensitivity analysis did not materially change the results. Conclusions: Older patients may derive more LOS benefit from minimally invasive approaches than younger patients. Given the greater expense associated with the minimally invasive approach, an age-adapted strategy to using this technology may be reasonable.

AB - Objectives: The length-of-stay (LOS) benefit of minimally invasive cystectomy varies in the published literature, potentially because of subgroup effects. Here, we investigated the effect of minimally invasive cystectomy on LOS among different age groups. Methods and materials: Adult patients who underwent cystectomy (open or minimally invasive) from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2016, were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate the adjusted association between the surgical approach and LOS after stratifying patients by age (40–64, 65–79, and ≥80 years). A sensitivity analysis was performed after multiple imputation by using age as a continuous variable with a third-order polynomial term. Results: Of the 5,561 patients identified, 640 underwent minimally invasive cystectomy and 4,921 had open cystectomy. The unadjusted analysis showed that minimally invasive cystectomy was associated with a shorter mean LOS compared with the open approach (8.0 vs. 9.7 days; P < 0.001). The predicted difference in LOS between the 2 approaches was 0.72 days (95% confidence interval (CI), −0.28 to 1.72; P = 0.16) for patients aged 40 to 64 years, 1.48 days (95% CI, 0.73–2.23; P < 0.001) for 65 to 79 years, and 2.56 days (95% CI, 0.84–4.29; P = 0.01) for ≥80 years favoring the minimally invasive approach. The sensitivity analysis did not materially change the results. Conclusions: Older patients may derive more LOS benefit from minimally invasive approaches than younger patients. Given the greater expense associated with the minimally invasive approach, an age-adapted strategy to using this technology may be reasonable.

KW - Bladder cancer

KW - Cystectomy

KW - Length of stay

KW - Robotic surgery procedures

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