Risk of occult inguinofemoral lymph node metastasis from squamous carcinoma of the vulva

Jesus Gonzalez Bosquet, Walter K. Kinney, Anthony H. Russell, Thomas A. Gaffey, Javier F. Magrina, Karl C. Podratz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study was undertaken to correlate preoperative primary tumor size and American Joint Committee on Cancer and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics categories with the risk of subclinical metastases from squamous carcinoma of the vulva to inguinofemoral nodes in patients with a palpably negative groin preoperatively. Methods and Materials: Clinical notes, operative reports, and pathology reports from 1955 to 1990 were reviewed to assign retrospectively 1969 American Joint Committee on Cancer N0 and N1 and 1988 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics T categories. Results: Of 446 patients with primary carcinoma of the vulva, 226 had a groin without features indicative of lymph node metastasis. Occult groin node metastases were detected in 15.2%, 30.0%, 24.5%, and 0% of patients with T1, T2, T3, and T4 cancers, respectively. Subclinical node metastases were found in 7.0%, 22.2%, 26.9%, 34.1%, and 20.0% of patients with primary cancers measuring 1.0 cm or less, 1.1 to 2.0 cm, 2.1 to 3.0 cm, 3.1 to 5.0 cm, and larger than 5 cm, respectively. Conclusions: Efficacy assessment for elective groin node irradiation and quantitative description of the radiation dose-control relationship for subclinical disease should be based on estimates of the risk of subclinical disease within the target volume. This study may help to assess the effectiveness of current therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-424
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

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Vulva
lymphatic system
metastasis
Groin
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Lymph Nodes
cancer
Neoplasm Metastasis
gynecology
federations
Neoplasms
Gynecology
Obstetrics
pathology
therapy
Radiation
Pathology
Carcinoma
tumors
dosage

Keywords

  • Lymph node metastasis
  • Radiation therapy
  • Vulvar neoplasm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation

Cite this

Risk of occult inguinofemoral lymph node metastasis from squamous carcinoma of the vulva. / Bosquet, Jesus Gonzalez; Kinney, Walter K.; Russell, Anthony H.; Gaffey, Thomas A.; Magrina, Javier F.; Podratz, Karl C.

In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, Vol. 57, No. 2, 01.10.2003, p. 419-424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bosquet, Jesus Gonzalez ; Kinney, Walter K. ; Russell, Anthony H. ; Gaffey, Thomas A. ; Magrina, Javier F. ; Podratz, Karl C. / Risk of occult inguinofemoral lymph node metastasis from squamous carcinoma of the vulva. In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. 2003 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 419-424.
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