Risk Factors For and Outcomes of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Infections in Children

Adaora S. Uzodi, Christine M. Lohse, Ritu Banerjee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The recent increase in multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli infections is not well described in children. We determined the risk factors and outcomes of extraintestinal E. coli infections in children in our region. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children ≤18 years in Olmsted County, MN, USA, between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. MDR isolates were defined as resistant to ≥3 antibiotic classes. Results: A total of 368 children each contributed 1 isolate. Isolates were predominantly community-associated (82%) and from urine (90%), and outpatients (86%); 46 (13%) isolates were MDR. In multivariable analysis, genitourinary (GU) tract anomaly (OR 2.42, 95% CI 1.03–5.68), invasive devices (OR 3.48, 95% CI 1.37–8.83) and antibiotic use at presentation (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.06–6.47) were associated with MDR E. coli. Children with MDR infections were more likely to have a complex infection (35% vs. 17%, P = 0.026), less likely to receive effective empiric antibiotics (47% vs. 74%, P < 0.001), had longer time to receipt of effective antibiotics (median 19.2 vs. 0.6 h, P < 0.001), and longer hospitalization (median 10 vs. 4 days, P = 0.029) than children with non-MDR infections. Conclusion: Pediatric MDR E. coli infection was associated with GU tract anomaly, invasive devices, antibiotic use, delays in effective therapy and longer hospitalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-257
Number of pages13
JournalInfectious Diseases and Therapy
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Escherichia coli Infections
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Hospitalization
Infection
Equipment and Supplies
Cohort Studies
Outpatients
Retrospective Studies
Urine
Pediatrics
Escherichia coli

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • E. coli
  • Multidrug-resistant E. coli

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Risk Factors For and Outcomes of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Infections in Children. / Uzodi, Adaora S.; Lohse, Christine M.; Banerjee, Ritu.

In: Infectious Diseases and Therapy, Vol. 6, No. 2, 01.06.2017, p. 245-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Uzodi, Adaora S. ; Lohse, Christine M. ; Banerjee, Ritu. / Risk Factors For and Outcomes of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Infections in Children. In: Infectious Diseases and Therapy. 2017 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 245-257.
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