Rifaximin, Microbiota Biology, and Hepatic Encephalopathy

Cedric Peleman, Michael Camilleri

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Rifaximin is beneficial in the treatment of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Kang et al. (Clin Transl Gastroenterol 7: e187; doi:10.1038/ctg.2016.44) investigated the effects of rifaximin in a mouse model of MHE-associated microbiota without concomitant liver disease. In addition to some impact on the composition of microbiota, rifaximin altered bacterial functions, ameliorated local and systemic inflammation, and reduced enterocyte glutaminase activity. We discuss these effects as well as the interpretation of the permeability studies, given the potential interaction of dysbiosis with dysfunctional intestinal barrier, leading to systemic inflammation and increased uptake of bacterial metabolites that contribute to MHE in the presence of hepatic dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere195
JournalClinical and Translational Gastroenterology
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 6 2016

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rifaximin
Hepatic Encephalopathy
Microbiota
Dysbiosis
Glutaminase
Inflammation
Enterocytes
Liver Diseases
Permeability
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Rifaximin, Microbiota Biology, and Hepatic Encephalopathy. / Peleman, Cedric; Camilleri, Michael.

In: Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, Vol. 7, No. 10, e195, 06.10.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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