Retinal Arterio-Arterial Collaterals in Susac Syndrome

Robert A. Egan, Guy Jirawuthiworavong, Norah S. Lincoff, John Chen, Courtney E. Francis, Jacqueline A. Leavitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The ophthalmic findings of Susac syndrome (SS) consist of visual field defects related to branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), and fluorescein angiography (FA) reveals a unique staining pattern. To date, retinal arterial collateral development has been described only in a single patient. Given that the immunopathological process in SS induces retinal ischemia, it is conceivable that abnormal blood vessel development may occur in affected individuals. METHODS: This is a retrospective observational study. The medical records including fundus photography and FA of all patients with SS were reviewed, and those with any type of retinal arterial collateral were identified. RESULTS: A total of 11 patients were identified with retinal collaterals. Five were men. Age ranged from 20 to 50 years. Ten patients had arterio-arterial (A-A) collaterals and 1 had arterio-venous (A-V) collaterals, and all had collaterals remote from the optic disc. No collaterals were present at onset of illness and the first developed at 9 months. CONCLUSIONS: The literature reveals scant evidence for the association between BRAO and retinal arterial collaterals. Our findings indicate that retinal arterial collaterals in SS are usually A-A and not A-V and may be more common in this disorder than previously believed. Collaterals do not develop early in the disease, and there may be a predilection toward development in men. The chronic inflammatory state of SS may be the stimulus for the development of these arterial collaterals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-461
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of neuro-ophthalmology : the official journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Susac Syndrome
Retinal Artery Occlusion
Fluorescein Angiography
Photography
Optic Disk
Visual Fields
Medical Records
Observational Studies
Blood Vessels
Ischemia
Retrospective Studies
Staining and Labeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Retinal Arterio-Arterial Collaterals in Susac Syndrome. / Egan, Robert A.; Jirawuthiworavong, Guy; Lincoff, Norah S.; Chen, John; Francis, Courtney E.; Leavitt, Jacqueline A.

In: Journal of neuro-ophthalmology : the official journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society, Vol. 38, No. 4, 01.12.2018, p. 459-461.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Egan, Robert A. ; Jirawuthiworavong, Guy ; Lincoff, Norah S. ; Chen, John ; Francis, Courtney E. ; Leavitt, Jacqueline A. / Retinal Arterio-Arterial Collaterals in Susac Syndrome. In: Journal of neuro-ophthalmology : the official journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society. 2018 ; Vol. 38, No. 4. pp. 459-461.
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