Restoring oxidant signaling suppresses proarthritogenic T cell effector functions in rheumatoid arthritis

Zhen Yang, Yi Shen, Hisashi Oishi, Eric Lawrence Matteson, Lu Tian, Jörg J. Goronzy, Cornelia M. Weyand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), CD4+ T cells hyperproliferate during clonal expansion, differentiating into cytokine-producing effector cells that contribute to disease pathology. However, the metabolic underpinnings of this hyperproliferation remain unclear. In contrast to healthy T cells, naïve RA T cells had a defect in glycolytic flux due to the up-regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Excess G6PD shunted glucose into the pentose phosphate pathway, resulting in NADPH (reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) accumulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) consumption. With surplus reductive equivalents, RA T cells insufficiently activated the redox-sensitive kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), bypassed the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint, and hyperproliferated. Moreover, insufficient ATM activation biased T cell differentiation toward the T helper 1 (TH1) and TH17 lineages, imposing a hyperinflammatory phenotype. We have identified several interventions that replenish intracellular ROS, which corrected the abnormal proliferative behavior of RA T cells and successfully suppressed synovial inflammation. Thus, rebalancing glucose utilization and restoring oxidant signaling may provide a therapeutic strategy to prevent autoimmunity in RA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number331ra38
JournalScience Translational Medicine
Volume8
Issue number331
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 23 2016

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Oxidants
Rheumatoid Arthritis
T-Lymphocytes
Ataxia Telangiectasia
Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase
Reactive Oxygen Species
G2 Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Glucose
Pentose Phosphate Pathway
Autoimmunity
NADP
Oxygen Consumption
Oxidation-Reduction
Cell Differentiation
Phosphotransferases
Up-Regulation
Pathology
Cytokines
Inflammation
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Restoring oxidant signaling suppresses proarthritogenic T cell effector functions in rheumatoid arthritis. / Yang, Zhen; Shen, Yi; Oishi, Hisashi; Matteson, Eric Lawrence; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

In: Science Translational Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 331, 331ra38, 23.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Zhen ; Shen, Yi ; Oishi, Hisashi ; Matteson, Eric Lawrence ; Tian, Lu ; Goronzy, Jörg J. ; Weyand, Cornelia M. / Restoring oxidant signaling suppresses proarthritogenic T cell effector functions in rheumatoid arthritis. In: Science Translational Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 8, No. 331.
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