Respiratory failure as the presenting manifestation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Narat Srivali, Jay H Ryu, Jeffrey T. Rabatin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) does not directly affect the lung parenchyma, it can jeopardize the mechanical function of the respiratory system. About one-quarter of ALS patients have had at least one prior misdiagnosis. Therefore, a high clinical suspicion, and careful correlation of physical examination and electromyography (EMG) are needed to reach the correct diagnosis. We report a 65-year-old man who presented with a progressive exertional dyspnea. He was subsequently found to have a diaphragmatic paralysis that was felt to be secondary to spinal cord stenosis. However, his subsequent EMG showed evidence of muscle fasciculation and he was ultimately diagnosed with ALS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Clinical Neuroscience
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 12 2015

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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Respiratory Insufficiency
Electromyography
Respiratory Paralysis
Fasciculation
Spinal Stenosis
Diagnostic Errors
Respiratory System
Dyspnea
Physical Examination
Spinal Cord
Muscles
Lung

Keywords

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Diaphragmatic paralysis
  • Respiratory failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Respiratory failure as the presenting manifestation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. / Srivali, Narat; Ryu, Jay H; Rabatin, Jeffrey T.

In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, 12.12.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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