Resolution of cochlear inflammation

Novel target for preventing or ameliorating drug-, noise- and age-related hearing Losss

Gilda M. Kalinec, Gwen Lomberk, Raul A. Urrutia, Federico Kalinec

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A significant number of studies support the idea that inflammatory responses are intimately associated with drug-, noise-and age-related hearing loss (DRHL, NRHL and ARHL). Consequently, several clinical strategies aimed at reducing auditory dysfunction by preventing inflammation are currently under intense scrutiny. Inflammation, however, is a normal adaptive response aimed at restoring tissue functionality and homeostasis after infection, tissue injury and even stress under sterile conditions, and suppressing it could have unintended negative consequences. Therefore, an appropriate approach to prevent or ameliorate DRHL, NRHL and ARHL should involve improving the resolution of the inflammatory process in the cochlea rather than inhibiting this phenomenon. The resolution of inflammation is not a passive response but rather an active, highly controlled and coordinated process. Inflammation by itself produces specialized pro-resolving mediators with critical functions, including essential fatty acid derivatives (lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins), proteins and peptides such as annexin A1 and galectins, purines (adenosine), gaseous mediators (NO, H2S and CO), as well as neuromodulators like acetylcholine and netrin-1. In this review article, we describe recent advances in the understanding of the resolution phase of inflammation and highlight therapeutic strategies that might be useful in preventing inflammation-induced cochlear damage. In particular, we emphasize beneficial approaches that have been tested in pre-clinical models of inflammatory responses induced by recognized ototoxic drugs such as cisplatin and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Since these studies suggest that improving the resolution process could be useful for the prevention of inflammationassociated diseases in humans, we discuss the potential application of similar strategies to prevent or mitigate DRHL, NRHL and ARHL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number192
JournalFrontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 7 2017

Fingerprint

Cochlea
Hearing
Noise
Inflammation
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Gasotransmitters
CD59 Antigens
Lipoxins
Annexin A1
Galectins
Purines
Essential Fatty Acids
Aminoglycosides
Carbon Monoxide
Hearing Loss
Adenosine
Cisplatin
Acetylcholine
Neurotransmitter Agents
Homeostasis

Keywords

  • Age-related hearing loss
  • Annexin A1
  • Drug-induced hearing loss
  • Galectin
  • Inflammation
  • Lipid mediators
  • Noise-induced hearing loss
  • Resolution of inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Resolution of cochlear inflammation : Novel target for preventing or ameliorating drug-, noise- and age-related hearing Losss. / Kalinec, Gilda M.; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul A.; Kalinec, Federico.

In: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, Vol. 11, 192, 07.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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abstract = "A significant number of studies support the idea that inflammatory responses are intimately associated with drug-, noise-and age-related hearing loss (DRHL, NRHL and ARHL). Consequently, several clinical strategies aimed at reducing auditory dysfunction by preventing inflammation are currently under intense scrutiny. Inflammation, however, is a normal adaptive response aimed at restoring tissue functionality and homeostasis after infection, tissue injury and even stress under sterile conditions, and suppressing it could have unintended negative consequences. Therefore, an appropriate approach to prevent or ameliorate DRHL, NRHL and ARHL should involve improving the resolution of the inflammatory process in the cochlea rather than inhibiting this phenomenon. The resolution of inflammation is not a passive response but rather an active, highly controlled and coordinated process. Inflammation by itself produces specialized pro-resolving mediators with critical functions, including essential fatty acid derivatives (lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins), proteins and peptides such as annexin A1 and galectins, purines (adenosine), gaseous mediators (NO, H2S and CO), as well as neuromodulators like acetylcholine and netrin-1. In this review article, we describe recent advances in the understanding of the resolution phase of inflammation and highlight therapeutic strategies that might be useful in preventing inflammation-induced cochlear damage. In particular, we emphasize beneficial approaches that have been tested in pre-clinical models of inflammatory responses induced by recognized ototoxic drugs such as cisplatin and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Since these studies suggest that improving the resolution process could be useful for the prevention of inflammationassociated diseases in humans, we discuss the potential application of similar strategies to prevent or mitigate DRHL, NRHL and ARHL.",
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