Residents can be trained to detect abdominal aortic aneurysms using personal ultrasound imagers: A pilot study

Douglas L. Riegert-Johnson, Charles J. Bruce, Victor M. Montori, Rachel J. Cook, Peter C. Spittell

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Our objective was to test the hypothesis that internal medicine residents can be trained to screen for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) using personal ultrasound imagers. We trained 5 randomly chosen internal medicine residents to image the abdominal aorta for patients with risk factors for AAAs using personal ultrasound imagers. Residents were trained in 3 or 4 one-on-one sessions with an instructor. To be eligible, patients had to be older than 65 years and have hypertension. After training, each of the 5 residents studied 3 patients independently. In 12 of the residents' 15 unsupervised studies, their abdominal aorta measurements were within 5 mm of the instructor's measurements with standard echocardiography (mean difference 3 mm, range 0-6 mm). Residents detected 3 previously unknown AAAs measuring 5.2, 4.2, and 3.9 cm in diameter. We conclude residents can be trained to image the abdominal aorta with personal ultrasound imagers and to identify AAAs in patients at risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-397
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Society of Echocardiography
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2005
EventSixteenth Annual Scientific Sessions - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Jun 15 2005Jun 18 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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