Rescue treatment of thromboembolic complications during endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE-: Acute intraprocedural thrombus formation complicating endovascular cerebral aneurysm treatment is often treated with intra-arterial or intravenous administration of thrombolytic agents or glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GpIIb/IIIa) inhibitors. We sought to evaluate the morbidity and mortality associated with such treatments using a large multihospital database. METHODS-: Using the Premier Perspective Database, we examined outcomes for patients receiving endovascular coiling for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms requiring rescue therapy, defined as treatment with GpIIb/IIIa inhibitors and fibrinolytic therapy. We compared discharge status, length of stay, and complication rates across 3 groups: (1) patients receiving GpIIb/IIIa inhibitors only, (2) patients receiving fibrinolytic therapy only, and (3) patients receiving both GpIIb/IIIa inhibitors and fibrinolytics. Student t test was used to compare continuous variables, and Fisher exact test was used to compare categorical variables. RESULTS-: Seven-percent (254/3627) of patients treated for unruptured aneurysms received rescue therapy. When compared with patients receiving GpIIb/IIIa inhibitors alone, patients receiving only fibrinolytics had significantly higher rates of discharge to institutions other than home (37.5% [9/24] versus 7.4% [15/201]; P<0.0001). Eight-percent of patients (338/4204) treated for ruptured aneurysms received rescue therapy. When compared with patients receiving GpIIb/IIIa inhibitors alone, patients receiving only fibrinolytics had significantly higher rates of mortality (26.0% [18/69] versus 14.5% [35/241]; P=0.02) and discharge to institutions other than home (59.4% [41/69] versus 36.5% [88/241]; P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS-: Pharmacological rescue therapy occurred in 7% to 8% of endovascular coiling patients with unruptured and ruptured intracranial aneurysms. Rescue therapy with thrombolytic agents resulted in significantly more morbidity and mortality than rescue therapy with GpIIb/IIIa inhibitors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1343-1347
Number of pages5
JournalStroke
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

Keywords

  • endovascular treatment
  • interventional neuroradiology
  • outcomes
  • subarachnoid hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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