Repair of Pectus Chest Deformities in 320 Adult Patients

21 Year Experience

Dawn E. Jaroszewski, Eric W. Fonkalsrud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Severe pectus chest deformities are common, often causing physiologic impairment. Patients who do not undergo repair during childhood often experience progressive worsening of symptoms during adulthood. There are few published reports regarding pectus repair in adults. Methods: A retrospective review from January 1986 through January 2007 was performed on patients age 19 years and older, who underwent surgical correction of pectus excavatum (PE) or carinatum (PC) at one hospital. Results: Adult patients, including 268 PE (84%), 41 PC (13%), and 11 with combined deformities (3%) underwent open repair with minimal cartilage resection and a temporary internal support strut. Ages ranged from 19 to 67 years (mean, 27). Patients experienced dyspnea, decreased endurance and tachypnea with mild exertion (99%), tachycardia (94%), and chest pain (69%). All patients reported worsening of symptoms during adolescence, which became more severe during adulthood. The mean severity score for PC and PE was 1.8 and 5.8, respectively (normal = 2.5). All patients experienced improvement in symptoms within four months after repair. Mean hospitalization was 2.9 days. Complications included pleural effusion (n = 8), pneumothorax (n = 4), and pericarditis (n = 2). Small localized protrusions persisted in eight patients. Four patients underwent repair of mild recurrent deformities. There were no deaths. Ninety-eight percent reported considerable improvement in exercise tolerance and indicated postoperative results as very good or excellent. Conclusions: Uncorrected pectus deformities persist after childhood and often cause worsening symptoms with increasing age. Repair can be performed in adults with low morbidity, short hospital stay, and considerable improvement in physiologic function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-433
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thorax
Funnel Chest
Tachypnea
Exercise Tolerance
Pericarditis
Pneumothorax
Pleural Effusion
Chest Pain
Tachycardia
Dyspnea
Cartilage
Length of Stay
Hospitalization
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Repair of Pectus Chest Deformities in 320 Adult Patients : 21 Year Experience. / Jaroszewski, Dawn E.; Fonkalsrud, Eric W.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 84, No. 2, 08.2007, p. 429-433.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jaroszewski, Dawn E. ; Fonkalsrud, Eric W. / Repair of Pectus Chest Deformities in 320 Adult Patients : 21 Year Experience. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 84, No. 2. pp. 429-433.
@article{26d2566ce84a42dabbac942edb19c036,
title = "Repair of Pectus Chest Deformities in 320 Adult Patients: 21 Year Experience",
abstract = "Background: Severe pectus chest deformities are common, often causing physiologic impairment. Patients who do not undergo repair during childhood often experience progressive worsening of symptoms during adulthood. There are few published reports regarding pectus repair in adults. Methods: A retrospective review from January 1986 through January 2007 was performed on patients age 19 years and older, who underwent surgical correction of pectus excavatum (PE) or carinatum (PC) at one hospital. Results: Adult patients, including 268 PE (84{\%}), 41 PC (13{\%}), and 11 with combined deformities (3{\%}) underwent open repair with minimal cartilage resection and a temporary internal support strut. Ages ranged from 19 to 67 years (mean, 27). Patients experienced dyspnea, decreased endurance and tachypnea with mild exertion (99{\%}), tachycardia (94{\%}), and chest pain (69{\%}). All patients reported worsening of symptoms during adolescence, which became more severe during adulthood. The mean severity score for PC and PE was 1.8 and 5.8, respectively (normal = 2.5). All patients experienced improvement in symptoms within four months after repair. Mean hospitalization was 2.9 days. Complications included pleural effusion (n = 8), pneumothorax (n = 4), and pericarditis (n = 2). Small localized protrusions persisted in eight patients. Four patients underwent repair of mild recurrent deformities. There were no deaths. Ninety-eight percent reported considerable improvement in exercise tolerance and indicated postoperative results as very good or excellent. Conclusions: Uncorrected pectus deformities persist after childhood and often cause worsening symptoms with increasing age. Repair can be performed in adults with low morbidity, short hospital stay, and considerable improvement in physiologic function.",
author = "Jaroszewski, {Dawn E.} and Fonkalsrud, {Eric W.}",
year = "2007",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.athoracsur.2007.03.077",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "84",
pages = "429--433",
journal = "Annals of Thoracic Surgery",
issn = "0003-4975",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Repair of Pectus Chest Deformities in 320 Adult Patients

T2 - 21 Year Experience

AU - Jaroszewski, Dawn E.

AU - Fonkalsrud, Eric W.

PY - 2007/8

Y1 - 2007/8

N2 - Background: Severe pectus chest deformities are common, often causing physiologic impairment. Patients who do not undergo repair during childhood often experience progressive worsening of symptoms during adulthood. There are few published reports regarding pectus repair in adults. Methods: A retrospective review from January 1986 through January 2007 was performed on patients age 19 years and older, who underwent surgical correction of pectus excavatum (PE) or carinatum (PC) at one hospital. Results: Adult patients, including 268 PE (84%), 41 PC (13%), and 11 with combined deformities (3%) underwent open repair with minimal cartilage resection and a temporary internal support strut. Ages ranged from 19 to 67 years (mean, 27). Patients experienced dyspnea, decreased endurance and tachypnea with mild exertion (99%), tachycardia (94%), and chest pain (69%). All patients reported worsening of symptoms during adolescence, which became more severe during adulthood. The mean severity score for PC and PE was 1.8 and 5.8, respectively (normal = 2.5). All patients experienced improvement in symptoms within four months after repair. Mean hospitalization was 2.9 days. Complications included pleural effusion (n = 8), pneumothorax (n = 4), and pericarditis (n = 2). Small localized protrusions persisted in eight patients. Four patients underwent repair of mild recurrent deformities. There were no deaths. Ninety-eight percent reported considerable improvement in exercise tolerance and indicated postoperative results as very good or excellent. Conclusions: Uncorrected pectus deformities persist after childhood and often cause worsening symptoms with increasing age. Repair can be performed in adults with low morbidity, short hospital stay, and considerable improvement in physiologic function.

AB - Background: Severe pectus chest deformities are common, often causing physiologic impairment. Patients who do not undergo repair during childhood often experience progressive worsening of symptoms during adulthood. There are few published reports regarding pectus repair in adults. Methods: A retrospective review from January 1986 through January 2007 was performed on patients age 19 years and older, who underwent surgical correction of pectus excavatum (PE) or carinatum (PC) at one hospital. Results: Adult patients, including 268 PE (84%), 41 PC (13%), and 11 with combined deformities (3%) underwent open repair with minimal cartilage resection and a temporary internal support strut. Ages ranged from 19 to 67 years (mean, 27). Patients experienced dyspnea, decreased endurance and tachypnea with mild exertion (99%), tachycardia (94%), and chest pain (69%). All patients reported worsening of symptoms during adolescence, which became more severe during adulthood. The mean severity score for PC and PE was 1.8 and 5.8, respectively (normal = 2.5). All patients experienced improvement in symptoms within four months after repair. Mean hospitalization was 2.9 days. Complications included pleural effusion (n = 8), pneumothorax (n = 4), and pericarditis (n = 2). Small localized protrusions persisted in eight patients. Four patients underwent repair of mild recurrent deformities. There were no deaths. Ninety-eight percent reported considerable improvement in exercise tolerance and indicated postoperative results as very good or excellent. Conclusions: Uncorrected pectus deformities persist after childhood and often cause worsening symptoms with increasing age. Repair can be performed in adults with low morbidity, short hospital stay, and considerable improvement in physiologic function.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34447562597&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34447562597&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2007.03.077

DO - 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2007.03.077

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 429

EP - 433

JO - Annals of Thoracic Surgery

JF - Annals of Thoracic Surgery

SN - 0003-4975

IS - 2

ER -