Relationships among subjective and objective measures of tongue strength and oral phase swallowing impairments

Heather M. Clark, Pamela A. Henson, William D. Barber, Julie A.G. Stierwalt, Michael Sherrill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Scopus citations

Abstract

A growing literature documents the relationship between tongue strength and oral phase swallowing function. Objective measures of strength have been recommended as more valid and reliable than subjective measures for the assessment of tongue function, yet subjective measures remain the more commonly used clinical method for assessing tongue strength. This study assessed the relationships among subjective and objective measures of tongue strength and oral phase swallowing impairments. Both subjective and objective measures of tongue strength were observed to be good predictors of the presence of oral phase swallowing impairments. The specific oral phase swallowing functions of bolus manipulation, mastication, and clearance were moderately correlated with subjective ratings of tongue strength. Experienced and inexperienced raters appeared to judge tongue strength differently, with the ratings of experienced raters being more predictive of swallowing function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-50
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican journal of speech-language pathology
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2003

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Keywords

  • Dysphagia
  • Oral nonspeech motor function
  • Swallowing assessment
  • Tongue strength

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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