Relationship of the apolipoprotein E polymorphism with carotid artery atherosclerosis

Mariza De Andrade, I. Thandi, S. Brown, A. Gotto, W. Patsch, E. Boerwinkle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

From the cohort taking part in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, a multicenter investigation of atherosclerosis and its sequelae in women and men ages 45-64 years, a sample of 145 subjects with significant carotid artery atherosclerosis but without clinically recognized coronary heart disease was identified along with 224 group-matched control subjects. The aim of this paper is to measure the association of the apolipoprotein (apo) E polymorphism with the prevalence of significant carotid artery atherosclerotic disease (CAAD) after considering the contribution of established risk factor variables. The first model used a stepwise selection procedure to define a group of significant physical and lifestyle characteristics and a group of significant plasma lipid, lipoprotein, and apolipoprotein variables that were predictive of CAAD status in this sample. Those variables selected included age (years), body mass index (BMI; kg/m2), consumption of cigarettes (CigYears; number of cigarettes/d x the number of smoking years), hypertension status, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)- cholesterol (mg/dl), total cholesterol (mg/dl), and Lp[a] (μg/ml). The second model was built by forcing into the equation an a priori set of demographic, anthropometric, and lipoprotein variables, which were age, BMI, CigYears, hypertensive status, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. In both models, the apo E genotype ε2/3 was related to CAAD status. For both models, the estimated odds ratio of being a CAAD case associated with the apo E genotype ε2/3 was >2:1. The mechanism of the observed association between the ε2/3 genotype and carotid atherosclerosis is unknown, but it is likely due to the known effects of the E2 isoform in causing delayed clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1379-1390
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Genetics
Volume56
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carotid Artery Diseases
Apolipoproteins E
Carotid Arteries
Apolipoprotein E2
Lipoproteins
Genotype
Tobacco Products
HDL Cholesterol
Atherosclerosis
Apolipoproteins
LDL Cholesterol
Multicenter Studies
Coronary Disease
Life Style
Protein Isoforms
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Research Design
Smoking
Odds Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

De Andrade, M., Thandi, I., Brown, S., Gotto, A., Patsch, W., & Boerwinkle, E. (1995). Relationship of the apolipoprotein E polymorphism with carotid artery atherosclerosis. American Journal of Human Genetics, 56(6), 1379-1390.

Relationship of the apolipoprotein E polymorphism with carotid artery atherosclerosis. / De Andrade, Mariza; Thandi, I.; Brown, S.; Gotto, A.; Patsch, W.; Boerwinkle, E.

In: American Journal of Human Genetics, Vol. 56, No. 6, 1995, p. 1379-1390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Andrade, M, Thandi, I, Brown, S, Gotto, A, Patsch, W & Boerwinkle, E 1995, 'Relationship of the apolipoprotein E polymorphism with carotid artery atherosclerosis', American Journal of Human Genetics, vol. 56, no. 6, pp. 1379-1390.
De Andrade, Mariza ; Thandi, I. ; Brown, S. ; Gotto, A. ; Patsch, W. ; Boerwinkle, E. / Relationship of the apolipoprotein E polymorphism with carotid artery atherosclerosis. In: American Journal of Human Genetics. 1995 ; Vol. 56, No. 6. pp. 1379-1390.
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