Relation of Increased Leptin Concentrations to History of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in the United States Population†All the analysis, interpretation, and/or conclusion reached in this study are the work of the authors and not of the National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, Maryland.

Justo Sierra-Johnson, Abel Romero-Corral, Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, Apoor Suresh Gami, Fatima Helena Sert Kuniyoshi, Robert Wolk, Virend Kristen Somers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Scopus citations

Abstract

Leptin, an adipose tissue-derived hormone, has been linked to cardiovascular outcomes; however, data are limited in the United States population, especially women. To assess the association between leptin concentrations and history of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, we analyzed data from 6,239 subjects (mean age 47 years; 3,336 women) with measurements of serum leptin and full assessment of cardiovascular risk factors from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III. Logistic regression was used to estimate the cross-sectional association of leptin concentrations (highest quartile versus lowest quartile) and history of MI, stroke, and the composite end point of MI or stroke (MI/stroke). Gender-specific models of leptin were adjusted for age, race, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and obesity status. There were 212 men with MI/stroke (5.4%), 154 with MI (4.1%), and 82 with stroke (1.7%). There were 135 women with MI/stroke (2.6%), 74 with MI (1.5%), and 78 with stroke (1.4%). In multivariate analysis, high leptin level was significantly and independently associated with MI/stroke in men (odds ratio [OR] 2.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20 to 4.93) and women (OR 4.26, 95% CI 1.75 to 10.73); with MI in men (OR 3.16, 95% CI 1.40 to 7.37) and women (OR 3.96, 95% CI 1.29 to 12.72), and with stroke in women (OR 3.20, 95% CI 1.04 to 10.54) but not in men (OR 1.37, 95% CI 0.38 to 3.88). In conclusion, in the United States population, increased leptin concentrations are significantly associated with MI/stroke in men and women independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and obesity status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-239
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume100
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Relation of Increased Leptin Concentrations to History of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in the United States Population<sup>†</sup>†All the analysis, interpretation, and/or conclusion reached in this study are the work of the authors and not of the National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, Maryland.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this