Regulation of complex pulsatile and rhythmic neuroendocrine systems: The male gonadal axis as a prototype

Johannes D. Veldhuis, Daniel M. Keenan, Steven M. Pincus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hormone-secreting glands communicate via intermittent (pulsatile or rhythmic) signal exchange. Signals act upon target glands via implicit (not directly observable) stimulatory and inhibitory dose-response functions. Time delays operate, since secreted hormones do not arrive at or act on responsive cells instantaneously. Neuroendocrine systems are unique examples, therefore, of intermittent time-delayed dose-dependent homeostatic ensembles. Investigating such ensembles thus requires estimating secretion from plasma concentrations, recognizing biological time-delays and reconstructing unobserved feedforward (agonist) and feedback (antagonist) dose-response interfaces as illustrated primarily for the GnRH-LH-T-axis, and secondarily for the corticotropic and somatotropic axes. In this manner, each neuroendocrine system is viewed as a whole, rather than the sum of individual parts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-110
Number of pages32
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume181
Issue numberC
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Keywords

  • Acth
  • Cortisol
  • Gh
  • Lh
  • Pulses
  • Rhythms
  • Secretion
  • Testosterone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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