Reduction in medication costs for patients with chronic nonmalignant pain completing a pain rehabilitation program: A prospective analysis of admission, discharge, and 6-month follow-up medication costs

Julie L. Cunningham, Jeffrey D. Rome, Jennifer L. Kerkvliet, Cynthia O. Townsend

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Chronic nonmalignant pain (CNMP) is both a prevalent and a costly health problem in our society. Pain rehabilitation programs have been shown to provide cost-effective treatment. A treatment goal for some rehabilitation programs is reduction in the use of pain-related medication. Medication costs savings from pain rehabilitation programs have not been analyzed in previous studies. Design: This prospective cohort study of 186 patients with CNMP addresses the costs of medications at admission to a 3-week outpatient pain rehabilitation program, at discharge, and at 6-month follow-up. Medication use was determined through a detailed pharmacist interview with patients at admission and discharge. Patients were sent questionnaires 6 months after program completion, which obtained current medication information. Results: Statistically significant medication cost savings were seen for program completers at discharge and at 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05). The mean (standard deviation) daily prescription medication cost reduction from admission to discharge was $9.31 ($12.70) using the average wholesale price of medications. From the original study cohort, 121 patients completed the 6-month follow-up survey. The mean daily prescription medication cost savings from admission to 6-month follow-up was $6.68 ($14.40). Conclusion: Patients benefited from significant medication cost savings at the completion of the 3-week outpatient pain rehabilitation program and maintained significant savings after 6 months. This study adds to the current literature on the economic value of comprehensive pain rehabilitation programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)787-796
Number of pages10
JournalPain Medicine
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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Chronic Pain
Rehabilitation
Cost Savings
Costs and Cost Analysis
Pain
Prescriptions
Cohort Studies
Outpatients
Patient Discharge
Patient Admission
Pharmacists
Health Care Costs
Economics
Prospective Studies
Interviews
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Cost
  • Medication
  • Pain rehabilitation
  • Pharmacist

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Reduction in medication costs for patients with chronic nonmalignant pain completing a pain rehabilitation program : A prospective analysis of admission, discharge, and 6-month follow-up medication costs. / Cunningham, Julie L.; Rome, Jeffrey D.; Kerkvliet, Jennifer L.; Townsend, Cynthia O.

In: Pain Medicine, Vol. 10, No. 5, 2009, p. 787-796.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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