Reducing probe dependent drift in atomic force microscope with symmetrically supported torsion levers

Arthur Beyder, Chiara Spagnoli, Frederick Sachs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drift and thermal instability present significant limitations to atomic force microscopy and other cantilever-based sensor measurements. Most drift has been attributed to the asymmetric geometry of the cantilever, which acts as a chemical and thermal bimorphs. For example, cantilevers drift hundreds of nanometers upon immersion in water. The time course of drift is roughly exponential with a time constant of ∼70 min. Symmetrically supported torsion cantilevers significantly reduce this drift. Prototypical torsion levers have long-term drift of 1.0±0.36 Åmin, more than an order of magnitude smaller than commercial cantilevers. These torsion levers also have extraordinarily high thermal stability. In response to a 20 °C change in bath temperature, they move an average of 15±11 nm, whereas traditional levers deflect by >1 μm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number056105
JournalReview of Scientific Instruments
Volume77
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

levers
Torsional stress
torsion
Microscopes
microscopes
probes
Atomic force microscopy
Thermodynamic stability
thermal instability
Geometry
Sensors
submerging
time constant
Water
baths
thermal stability
atomic force microscopy
Temperature
Hot Temperature
sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Instrumentation
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Reducing probe dependent drift in atomic force microscope with symmetrically supported torsion levers. / Beyder, Arthur; Spagnoli, Chiara; Sachs, Frederick.

In: Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 77, No. 5, 056105, 05.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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