Receptors and signaling in the innate immune system

Wai Kee Eddie Ip, Guillaume Charriere, Hyun Cho Ju, R. Alan B. Ezekowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review: In this review, we highlight the current conceptual framework for innate immunity. Recent findings: We highlight the interactions of pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors, non-Toll-like membrane-bound pattern recognition receptors, and intracellular sensors neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein, CIITA, HET-E, and TP1-leucine-rich repeat (NLRs). Toll-like receptors recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and activate signaling pathways that induce the expression of immune and proinflammatory genes. Toll-like receptors use overlapping signaling pathways that largely depend on intracellular adaptor molecules. Recent evidence suggests that non-Toll-like membrane-bound pattern recognition receptors such as dectin-1, CD36, and CD14 collaborate with Toll-like receptors in pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition or use Toll-like receptors as signaling partners. NLRs, whose function is to detect intracellular pathogen-associated molecular patterns, also share the signaling pathways used by some Toll-like receptors, suggesting cooperation and synergy between NLRs and Toll-like receptors. Summary: The integration of signals generated from Toll-like receptors and other non-Toll-like receptors might instruct the nature and outcome of the immune response to a particular pathogen. This has implications for inflammatory diseases and host defense, because understanding these precise interactions presents novel targets for specific therapeutics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-333
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent opinion in organ transplantation
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Toll-Like Receptors
Immune System
Pattern Recognition Receptors
Neuronal Apoptosis-Inhibitory Protein
Membranes
Innate Immunity
Leucine
Genes

Keywords

  • Innate immunity
  • Nucleotide Oligomerization Domain containing proteins (NODs)
  • Toll-like receptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Receptors and signaling in the innate immune system. / Ip, Wai Kee Eddie; Charriere, Guillaume; Ju, Hyun Cho; Ezekowitz, R. Alan B.

In: Current opinion in organ transplantation, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.12.2005, p. 326-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ip, Wai Kee Eddie ; Charriere, Guillaume ; Ju, Hyun Cho ; Ezekowitz, R. Alan B. / Receptors and signaling in the innate immune system. In: Current opinion in organ transplantation. 2005 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 326-333.
@article{5f2e556d71a348dcb79904a503dd3400,
title = "Receptors and signaling in the innate immune system",
abstract = "Purpose of review: In this review, we highlight the current conceptual framework for innate immunity. Recent findings: We highlight the interactions of pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors, non-Toll-like membrane-bound pattern recognition receptors, and intracellular sensors neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein, CIITA, HET-E, and TP1-leucine-rich repeat (NLRs). Toll-like receptors recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and activate signaling pathways that induce the expression of immune and proinflammatory genes. Toll-like receptors use overlapping signaling pathways that largely depend on intracellular adaptor molecules. Recent evidence suggests that non-Toll-like membrane-bound pattern recognition receptors such as dectin-1, CD36, and CD14 collaborate with Toll-like receptors in pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition or use Toll-like receptors as signaling partners. NLRs, whose function is to detect intracellular pathogen-associated molecular patterns, also share the signaling pathways used by some Toll-like receptors, suggesting cooperation and synergy between NLRs and Toll-like receptors. Summary: The integration of signals generated from Toll-like receptors and other non-Toll-like receptors might instruct the nature and outcome of the immune response to a particular pathogen. This has implications for inflammatory diseases and host defense, because understanding these precise interactions presents novel targets for specific therapeutics.",
keywords = "Innate immunity, Nucleotide Oligomerization Domain containing proteins (NODs), Toll-like receptors",
author = "Ip, {Wai Kee Eddie} and Guillaume Charriere and Ju, {Hyun Cho} and Ezekowitz, {R. Alan B.}",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/01.mot.0000186198.62727.4b",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "326--333",
journal = "Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation",
issn = "1087-2418",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Receptors and signaling in the innate immune system

AU - Ip, Wai Kee Eddie

AU - Charriere, Guillaume

AU - Ju, Hyun Cho

AU - Ezekowitz, R. Alan B.

PY - 2005/12/1

Y1 - 2005/12/1

N2 - Purpose of review: In this review, we highlight the current conceptual framework for innate immunity. Recent findings: We highlight the interactions of pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors, non-Toll-like membrane-bound pattern recognition receptors, and intracellular sensors neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein, CIITA, HET-E, and TP1-leucine-rich repeat (NLRs). Toll-like receptors recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and activate signaling pathways that induce the expression of immune and proinflammatory genes. Toll-like receptors use overlapping signaling pathways that largely depend on intracellular adaptor molecules. Recent evidence suggests that non-Toll-like membrane-bound pattern recognition receptors such as dectin-1, CD36, and CD14 collaborate with Toll-like receptors in pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition or use Toll-like receptors as signaling partners. NLRs, whose function is to detect intracellular pathogen-associated molecular patterns, also share the signaling pathways used by some Toll-like receptors, suggesting cooperation and synergy between NLRs and Toll-like receptors. Summary: The integration of signals generated from Toll-like receptors and other non-Toll-like receptors might instruct the nature and outcome of the immune response to a particular pathogen. This has implications for inflammatory diseases and host defense, because understanding these precise interactions presents novel targets for specific therapeutics.

AB - Purpose of review: In this review, we highlight the current conceptual framework for innate immunity. Recent findings: We highlight the interactions of pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors, non-Toll-like membrane-bound pattern recognition receptors, and intracellular sensors neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein, CIITA, HET-E, and TP1-leucine-rich repeat (NLRs). Toll-like receptors recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and activate signaling pathways that induce the expression of immune and proinflammatory genes. Toll-like receptors use overlapping signaling pathways that largely depend on intracellular adaptor molecules. Recent evidence suggests that non-Toll-like membrane-bound pattern recognition receptors such as dectin-1, CD36, and CD14 collaborate with Toll-like receptors in pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition or use Toll-like receptors as signaling partners. NLRs, whose function is to detect intracellular pathogen-associated molecular patterns, also share the signaling pathways used by some Toll-like receptors, suggesting cooperation and synergy between NLRs and Toll-like receptors. Summary: The integration of signals generated from Toll-like receptors and other non-Toll-like receptors might instruct the nature and outcome of the immune response to a particular pathogen. This has implications for inflammatory diseases and host defense, because understanding these precise interactions presents novel targets for specific therapeutics.

KW - Innate immunity

KW - Nucleotide Oligomerization Domain containing proteins (NODs)

KW - Toll-like receptors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=28044432513&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=28044432513&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.mot.0000186198.62727.4b

DO - 10.1097/01.mot.0000186198.62727.4b

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:28044432513

VL - 10

SP - 326

EP - 333

JO - Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation

JF - Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation

SN - 1087-2418

IS - 4

ER -