Real-time biofeedback to target risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury: a technical report for injury prevention and rehabilitation

Kevin R. Ford, Christopher A. DiCesare, Gregory D. Myer, Timothy Hewett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CONTEXT: Biofeedback training enables an athlete to alter biomechanical and physiological function by receiving biomechanical and physiological data concurrent with or immediately after a task.

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of 2 different modes of real-time biofeedback focused on reducing risk factors related to anterior cruciate ligament injury.

DESIGN: Randomized crossover study design.

SETTING: Biomechanics laboratory and sports medicine center.

PARTICIPANTS: Female high school soccer players (age 14.8 ± 1.0 y, height 162.6 ± 6.8 cm, mass 55.9 ± 7.0 kg; n = 4).

INTERVENTION: A battery of kinetic- or kinematic-based real-time biofeedback during repetitive double-leg squats.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Baseline and posttraining drop vertical jumps were collected to determine if either feedback method improved high injury risk landing mechanics.

RESULTS: Maximum knee abduction moment and angle during the landing was significantly decreased after kinetic-focused biofeedback (P = .04). The reduced knee abduction moment during the drop vertical jumps after kinematic-focused biofeedback was not different (P = .2). Maximum knee abduction angle was significantly decreased after kinetic biofeedback (P < .01) but only showed a trend toward reduction after kinematic biofeedback (P = .08).

CONCLUSIONS: The innovative biofeedback employed in the current study reduced knee abduction load and posture from baseline to posttraining during a drop vertical jump.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
VolumeTechnical Notes 13
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Biomechanical Phenomena
Knee
Rehabilitation
Wounds and Injuries
Cross-Over Studies
Sports Medicine
Soccer
Mechanics
Posture
Athletes
Leg
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Real-time biofeedback to target risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury : a technical report for injury prevention and rehabilitation. / Ford, Kevin R.; DiCesare, Christopher A.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy.

In: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, Vol. Technical Notes 13, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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