Reactive nonsexually related acute genital ulcers

Review of cases evaluated at Mayo Clinic

Julia Lehman, Alison Bruce, David A. Wetter, Sara B. Ferguson, Roy S. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Reactive nonsexually related acute genital ulcers (RNSRAGU) occur in pubertal girls after an acute systemic infection. Objective: We sought to characterize RNSRAGU by reviewing the medical records of patients with this disorder. Methods: We searched our medical index database from 1997 to 2007 for RNSRAGU cases. Questionnaires were mailed to identified patients. Results: The study included 10 patients; 5 responded to the questionnaire. The mean age at onset was 11.5 years. Vulvar ulcers were preceded by viral gastroenteritis (n = 3), viral upper respiratory tract infection (n = 3), streptococcal pharyngitis (n = 1), influenza (n = 1), and other nonspecific febrile illnesses (n = 2). Seven patients had oral involvement also; 6 had at least one recurrence; and 3 were hospitalized for pain control. Analgesics and topical corticosteroids were the most common treatments. Ulcerations resolved within several weeks in all patients. Limitations: Retrospective study design, small study size, and 50% questionnaire response rate are limitations. Conclusions: Although rare, RNSRAGU should be considered when genital ulceration follows an acute systemic illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-51
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

Fingerprint

Ulcer
Pharyngitis
Gastroenteritis
Age of Onset
Respiratory Tract Infections
Human Influenza
Medical Records
Analgesics
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Fever
Retrospective Studies
Databases
Recurrence
Pain
Infection
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • genital ulcers
  • Lipschütz ulcer
  • ulcus vulvae acutum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Reactive nonsexually related acute genital ulcers : Review of cases evaluated at Mayo Clinic. / Lehman, Julia; Bruce, Alison; Wetter, David A.; Ferguson, Sara B.; Rogers, Roy S.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 63, No. 1, 01.07.2010, p. 44-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ac66b3bc652944c797a017c7dc1f6ca1,
title = "Reactive nonsexually related acute genital ulcers: Review of cases evaluated at Mayo Clinic",
abstract = "Background: Reactive nonsexually related acute genital ulcers (RNSRAGU) occur in pubertal girls after an acute systemic infection. Objective: We sought to characterize RNSRAGU by reviewing the medical records of patients with this disorder. Methods: We searched our medical index database from 1997 to 2007 for RNSRAGU cases. Questionnaires were mailed to identified patients. Results: The study included 10 patients; 5 responded to the questionnaire. The mean age at onset was 11.5 years. Vulvar ulcers were preceded by viral gastroenteritis (n = 3), viral upper respiratory tract infection (n = 3), streptococcal pharyngitis (n = 1), influenza (n = 1), and other nonspecific febrile illnesses (n = 2). Seven patients had oral involvement also; 6 had at least one recurrence; and 3 were hospitalized for pain control. Analgesics and topical corticosteroids were the most common treatments. Ulcerations resolved within several weeks in all patients. Limitations: Retrospective study design, small study size, and 50{\%} questionnaire response rate are limitations. Conclusions: Although rare, RNSRAGU should be considered when genital ulceration follows an acute systemic illness.",
keywords = "genital ulcers, Lipsch{\"u}tz ulcer, ulcus vulvae acutum",
author = "Julia Lehman and Alison Bruce and Wetter, {David A.} and Ferguson, {Sara B.} and Rogers, {Roy S.}",
year = "2010",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jaad.2009.08.038",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
pages = "44--51",
journal = "Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology",
issn = "0190-9622",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reactive nonsexually related acute genital ulcers

T2 - Review of cases evaluated at Mayo Clinic

AU - Lehman, Julia

AU - Bruce, Alison

AU - Wetter, David A.

AU - Ferguson, Sara B.

AU - Rogers, Roy S.

PY - 2010/7/1

Y1 - 2010/7/1

N2 - Background: Reactive nonsexually related acute genital ulcers (RNSRAGU) occur in pubertal girls after an acute systemic infection. Objective: We sought to characterize RNSRAGU by reviewing the medical records of patients with this disorder. Methods: We searched our medical index database from 1997 to 2007 for RNSRAGU cases. Questionnaires were mailed to identified patients. Results: The study included 10 patients; 5 responded to the questionnaire. The mean age at onset was 11.5 years. Vulvar ulcers were preceded by viral gastroenteritis (n = 3), viral upper respiratory tract infection (n = 3), streptococcal pharyngitis (n = 1), influenza (n = 1), and other nonspecific febrile illnesses (n = 2). Seven patients had oral involvement also; 6 had at least one recurrence; and 3 were hospitalized for pain control. Analgesics and topical corticosteroids were the most common treatments. Ulcerations resolved within several weeks in all patients. Limitations: Retrospective study design, small study size, and 50% questionnaire response rate are limitations. Conclusions: Although rare, RNSRAGU should be considered when genital ulceration follows an acute systemic illness.

AB - Background: Reactive nonsexually related acute genital ulcers (RNSRAGU) occur in pubertal girls after an acute systemic infection. Objective: We sought to characterize RNSRAGU by reviewing the medical records of patients with this disorder. Methods: We searched our medical index database from 1997 to 2007 for RNSRAGU cases. Questionnaires were mailed to identified patients. Results: The study included 10 patients; 5 responded to the questionnaire. The mean age at onset was 11.5 years. Vulvar ulcers were preceded by viral gastroenteritis (n = 3), viral upper respiratory tract infection (n = 3), streptococcal pharyngitis (n = 1), influenza (n = 1), and other nonspecific febrile illnesses (n = 2). Seven patients had oral involvement also; 6 had at least one recurrence; and 3 were hospitalized for pain control. Analgesics and topical corticosteroids were the most common treatments. Ulcerations resolved within several weeks in all patients. Limitations: Retrospective study design, small study size, and 50% questionnaire response rate are limitations. Conclusions: Although rare, RNSRAGU should be considered when genital ulceration follows an acute systemic illness.

KW - genital ulcers

KW - Lipschütz ulcer

KW - ulcus vulvae acutum

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77953286721&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77953286721&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jaad.2009.08.038

DO - 10.1016/j.jaad.2009.08.038

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 44

EP - 51

JO - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

JF - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

SN - 0190-9622

IS - 1

ER -