Rate of early/missed colorectal cancers after colonoscopy in older patients with or without inflammatory bowel disease in the united states

Yize R. Wang, John R. Cangemi, Edward Vincent Loftus, Jr, Michael F. Picco

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49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Previous studies on early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy excluded IBD patients. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy among IBD and non-IBD patients, and identify factors associated with early/missed CRCs.METHODS:All patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results Medicare-linked database who were 67 years or older at colonoscopy during 1998-2005 and those who were subsequently diagnosed with CRC within 36 months were identified. CRCs diagnosed within 6 months of colonoscopy were categorized as detected CRCs; CRCs diagnosed 6-36 months after colonoscopy were categorized as early/missed CRCs. The rate of early/missed CRCs was calculated as number of early/missed CRCs divided by number of detected and early/missed CRCs. The χ 2 test and multivariate logistic regression were used in statistical analysis.RESULTS:Of 55,008 CRC patients (304 Crohn's disease; 544 ulcerative colitis (UC)), the rate of early/missed CRCs was 5.8% for non-IBD patients, 15.1% for Crohn's, and 15.8% for UC (P<0.001). Compared with older non-IBD patients, early/missed CRCs among older IBD patients were less likely right-sided (both P<0.05). In multivariate logistic regression, the risk of early/missed CRCs was three times as high for IBD patients (Crohn's odds ratio (OR), 3.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.23-4.21; UC OR, 3.05; 95% CI, 2.44-3.81). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of this finding.CONCLUSIONS:Older IBD patients had a higher rate of early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy. Our finding supports intensive surveillance colonoscopy for older IBD patients as recommended by guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-449
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume108
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

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Colonoscopy
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Colorectal Neoplasms
Ulcerative Colitis
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Medicare
Crohn Disease
Epidemiology
Databases
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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Rate of early/missed colorectal cancers after colonoscopy in older patients with or without inflammatory bowel disease in the united states. / Wang, Yize R.; Cangemi, John R.; Loftus, Jr, Edward Vincent; Picco, Michael F.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 108, No. 3, 03.2013, p. 444-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Rate of early/missed colorectal cancers after colonoscopy in older patients with or without inflammatory bowel disease in the united states",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES:Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Previous studies on early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy excluded IBD patients. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy among IBD and non-IBD patients, and identify factors associated with early/missed CRCs.METHODS:All patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results Medicare-linked database who were 67 years or older at colonoscopy during 1998-2005 and those who were subsequently diagnosed with CRC within 36 months were identified. CRCs diagnosed within 6 months of colonoscopy were categorized as detected CRCs; CRCs diagnosed 6-36 months after colonoscopy were categorized as early/missed CRCs. The rate of early/missed CRCs was calculated as number of early/missed CRCs divided by number of detected and early/missed CRCs. The χ 2 test and multivariate logistic regression were used in statistical analysis.RESULTS:Of 55,008 CRC patients (304 Crohn's disease; 544 ulcerative colitis (UC)), the rate of early/missed CRCs was 5.8{\%} for non-IBD patients, 15.1{\%} for Crohn's, and 15.8{\%} for UC (P<0.001). Compared with older non-IBD patients, early/missed CRCs among older IBD patients were less likely right-sided (both P<0.05). In multivariate logistic regression, the risk of early/missed CRCs was three times as high for IBD patients (Crohn's odds ratio (OR), 3.07; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 2.23-4.21; UC OR, 3.05; 95{\%} CI, 2.44-3.81). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of this finding.CONCLUSIONS:Older IBD patients had a higher rate of early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy. Our finding supports intensive surveillance colonoscopy for older IBD patients as recommended by guidelines.",
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N2 - OBJECTIVES:Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Previous studies on early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy excluded IBD patients. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy among IBD and non-IBD patients, and identify factors associated with early/missed CRCs.METHODS:All patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results Medicare-linked database who were 67 years or older at colonoscopy during 1998-2005 and those who were subsequently diagnosed with CRC within 36 months were identified. CRCs diagnosed within 6 months of colonoscopy were categorized as detected CRCs; CRCs diagnosed 6-36 months after colonoscopy were categorized as early/missed CRCs. The rate of early/missed CRCs was calculated as number of early/missed CRCs divided by number of detected and early/missed CRCs. The χ 2 test and multivariate logistic regression were used in statistical analysis.RESULTS:Of 55,008 CRC patients (304 Crohn's disease; 544 ulcerative colitis (UC)), the rate of early/missed CRCs was 5.8% for non-IBD patients, 15.1% for Crohn's, and 15.8% for UC (P<0.001). Compared with older non-IBD patients, early/missed CRCs among older IBD patients were less likely right-sided (both P<0.05). In multivariate logistic regression, the risk of early/missed CRCs was three times as high for IBD patients (Crohn's odds ratio (OR), 3.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.23-4.21; UC OR, 3.05; 95% CI, 2.44-3.81). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of this finding.CONCLUSIONS:Older IBD patients had a higher rate of early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy. Our finding supports intensive surveillance colonoscopy for older IBD patients as recommended by guidelines.

AB - OBJECTIVES:Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Previous studies on early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy excluded IBD patients. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy among IBD and non-IBD patients, and identify factors associated with early/missed CRCs.METHODS:All patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results Medicare-linked database who were 67 years or older at colonoscopy during 1998-2005 and those who were subsequently diagnosed with CRC within 36 months were identified. CRCs diagnosed within 6 months of colonoscopy were categorized as detected CRCs; CRCs diagnosed 6-36 months after colonoscopy were categorized as early/missed CRCs. The rate of early/missed CRCs was calculated as number of early/missed CRCs divided by number of detected and early/missed CRCs. The χ 2 test and multivariate logistic regression were used in statistical analysis.RESULTS:Of 55,008 CRC patients (304 Crohn's disease; 544 ulcerative colitis (UC)), the rate of early/missed CRCs was 5.8% for non-IBD patients, 15.1% for Crohn's, and 15.8% for UC (P<0.001). Compared with older non-IBD patients, early/missed CRCs among older IBD patients were less likely right-sided (both P<0.05). In multivariate logistic regression, the risk of early/missed CRCs was three times as high for IBD patients (Crohn's odds ratio (OR), 3.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.23-4.21; UC OR, 3.05; 95% CI, 2.44-3.81). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of this finding.CONCLUSIONS:Older IBD patients had a higher rate of early/missed CRCs after colonoscopy. Our finding supports intensive surveillance colonoscopy for older IBD patients as recommended by guidelines.

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