Rapid molecular microbiologic diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection

Charles Cazanave, Kerryl E. Greenwood-Quaintance, Arlen D. Hanssen, Melissa J. Karau, Suzannah M. Schmidt, Eric O Gomez Urena, Jayawant Mandrekar, Douglas R. Osmon, Lindsay E. Lough, Bobbi S. Pritt, James M. Steckelberg, Robin Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We previously showed that culture of samples obtained by prosthesis vortexing and sonication was more sensitive than tissue culture for prosthetic joint infection (PJI) diagnosis. Despite improved sensitivity, culture-negative cases remained; furthermore, culture has a long turnaround time. We designed a genus-/group-specific rapid PCR assay panel targeting PJI bacteria and applied it to samples obtained by vortexing and sonicating explanted hip and knee prostheses, and we compared the results to those with sonicate fluid and periprosthetic tissue culture obtained at revision or resection arthroplasty. We studied 434 subjects with knee (n=272) or hip (n=162) prostheses; using a standardized definition, 144 had PJI. Sensitivities of tissue culture, of sonicate fluid culture, and of PCR were 70.1, 72.9, and 77.1%, respectively. Specificities were 97.9, 98.3, and 97.9%, respectively. Sonicate fluid PCR was more sensitive than tissue culture (P = 0.04). PCR of prosthesis sonication samples is more sensitive than tissue culture for the microbiologic diagnosis of prosthetic hip and knee infection and provides same-day PJI diagnosis with definition of microbiology. The high assay specificity suggests that typical PJI bacteria may not cause aseptic implant failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2280-2287
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Joints
Infection
Prostheses and Implants
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sonication
Hip
Knee
Bacteria
Knee Prosthesis
Hip Prosthesis
Microbiology
Arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cazanave, C., Greenwood-Quaintance, K. E., Hanssen, A. D., Karau, M. J., Schmidt, S. M., Urena, E. O. G., ... Patel, R. (2013). Rapid molecular microbiologic diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 51(7), 2280-2287. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00335-13

Rapid molecular microbiologic diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection. / Cazanave, Charles; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Hanssen, Arlen D.; Karau, Melissa J.; Schmidt, Suzannah M.; Urena, Eric O Gomez; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Osmon, Douglas R.; Lough, Lindsay E.; Pritt, Bobbi S.; Steckelberg, James M.; Patel, Robin.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 51, No. 7, 2013, p. 2280-2287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cazanave, C, Greenwood-Quaintance, KE, Hanssen, AD, Karau, MJ, Schmidt, SM, Urena, EOG, Mandrekar, J, Osmon, DR, Lough, LE, Pritt, BS, Steckelberg, JM & Patel, R 2013, 'Rapid molecular microbiologic diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection', Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 51, no. 7, pp. 2280-2287. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00335-13
Cazanave C, Greenwood-Quaintance KE, Hanssen AD, Karau MJ, Schmidt SM, Urena EOG et al. Rapid molecular microbiologic diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection. Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2013;51(7):2280-2287. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00335-13
Cazanave, Charles ; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E. ; Hanssen, Arlen D. ; Karau, Melissa J. ; Schmidt, Suzannah M. ; Urena, Eric O Gomez ; Mandrekar, Jayawant ; Osmon, Douglas R. ; Lough, Lindsay E. ; Pritt, Bobbi S. ; Steckelberg, James M. ; Patel, Robin. / Rapid molecular microbiologic diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection. In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2013 ; Vol. 51, No. 7. pp. 2280-2287.
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