Rapamycin

Immunosuppression, hyporesponsiveness, and side effects in a porcine renal allograft model

P. Stephen Almond, Adyr Moss, Raouf E. Nakhleh, Mark Melin, Sally Chen, Anastasio Salazar, Ken Shirabe, Arthur J. Matas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapamycin prolongs allograft survival and induces donor-specific tolerance in some small animal transplant models. Large animal studies, however, are limited. We studied rapamycin in a porcine renal allograft model. Donor-recipient combinations were chosen based on high response in pretransplant MLCs. Allografts were anastomosed to the aorta and vena cava and the native kidneys removed. There were 5 treatment groups: (a) no immunosuppression; (b) triple therapy (CsA, 1 mg/kg/day; AZA, 2–3 mg/kg/day; and PRED, 3–4 mg/kg/day); (c) rapamycin (0.75 mg/kg/day i.m.) in carboxymethylcellulose (CMC); (d) rapamycin (0.25 mg/kg/day i.m. in CMC); and (e) a vehicle (CMC) control. Serum creatinine levels were determined every other day. Most allografts were biopsied once a week. Immunosuppression was stopped after 30 days. Mean graft survival in nonimmunosuppressed recipients was 6.8±3.6 days. Mean graft survival in triple therapy recipients (n=10) was 45.7±36 days vs. 59.6±11.4 days in rapamycin (0.25 mg/kg/day) recipients (n=7) (P=0.51). Both triple therapy and rapamycin improved renal allograft survival versus nonimmunosuppressed controls (P=0.0025 and 0.001, respectively). Serum creatinine levels were significantly lower (P<0.05) in rapamycin versus triple therapy recipients. We conclude that rapamycin is a potent immunosuppressant in a porcine renal allograft model and may avoid the elevated serum creatinine levels associated with CsA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-281
Number of pages7
JournalTransplantation
Volume56
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sirolimus
Immunosuppression
Allografts
Swine
Kidney
Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium
Creatinine
Graft Survival
Serum
Therapeutics
Venae Cavae
Immunosuppressive Agents
Aorta
Animal Models
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

Almond, P. S., Moss, A., Nakhleh, R. E., Melin, M., Chen, S., Salazar, A., ... Matas, A. J. (1993). Rapamycin: Immunosuppression, hyporesponsiveness, and side effects in a porcine renal allograft model. Transplantation, 56(2), 275-281.

Rapamycin : Immunosuppression, hyporesponsiveness, and side effects in a porcine renal allograft model. / Almond, P. Stephen; Moss, Adyr; Nakhleh, Raouf E.; Melin, Mark; Chen, Sally; Salazar, Anastasio; Shirabe, Ken; Matas, Arthur J.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 56, No. 2, 1993, p. 275-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Almond, PS, Moss, A, Nakhleh, RE, Melin, M, Chen, S, Salazar, A, Shirabe, K & Matas, AJ 1993, 'Rapamycin: Immunosuppression, hyporesponsiveness, and side effects in a porcine renal allograft model', Transplantation, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 275-281.
Almond PS, Moss A, Nakhleh RE, Melin M, Chen S, Salazar A et al. Rapamycin: Immunosuppression, hyporesponsiveness, and side effects in a porcine renal allograft model. Transplantation. 1993;56(2):275-281.
Almond, P. Stephen ; Moss, Adyr ; Nakhleh, Raouf E. ; Melin, Mark ; Chen, Sally ; Salazar, Anastasio ; Shirabe, Ken ; Matas, Arthur J. / Rapamycin : Immunosuppression, hyporesponsiveness, and side effects in a porcine renal allograft model. In: Transplantation. 1993 ; Vol. 56, No. 2. pp. 275-281.
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AU - Salazar, Anastasio

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