Randomized trial showed requesting medical records with a survey produced a more representative sample than requesting separately

Melissa R. Partin, Diana J. Burgess, Krysten Halek, Joseph Grill, Sally W. Vernon, Deborah A. Fisher, Joan Griffin, Maureen Murdoch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The objective of the study was to compare the effect of two approaches to requesting medical records on survey response rates, sample representativeness, and the quality of self-reported screening. Study Design and Setting: Eight hundred ninety veterans aged 50-75 years from the Minneapolis VA Medical Center were randomly assigned to (1) records request included with a colorectal cancer screening survey ("with-survey" group) or (2) request in a separate mailing following a completed survey ("after-survey" group). Analyses compared response rates, the proportion and characteristics of patients providing records, and the validity of self-reported screening, by group. Results: Response rates did not vary by group (with-survey 76%; after-survey 78%, P = 0.45). 54% of with-survey and 47% of after-survey participants provided complete medical records (P = 0.06). In the with-survey group, patients with complete medical records were significantly more likely to be married and to have a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder; in the after-survey group, they were more likely to be aged 65-75 years, Caucasian, to have a family history of colorectal cancer, and to report being screened. Validity of self-reported screening did not vary significantly by group. Conclusion: The with-survey approach did not significantly reduce response rates or the quality of self-reported screening and produced a higher number and more representative sample with complete records.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1028-1035
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume61
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Medical Records
Surveys and Questionnaires
Colorectal Neoplasms
Veterans
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Early Detection of Cancer

Keywords

  • Cancer screening
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Informed consent
  • Patient participation
  • Patient surveys
  • Randomized trial
  • Research methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Randomized trial showed requesting medical records with a survey produced a more representative sample than requesting separately. / Partin, Melissa R.; Burgess, Diana J.; Halek, Krysten; Grill, Joseph; Vernon, Sally W.; Fisher, Deborah A.; Griffin, Joan; Murdoch, Maureen.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 61, No. 10, 10.2008, p. 1028-1035.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Partin, Melissa R. ; Burgess, Diana J. ; Halek, Krysten ; Grill, Joseph ; Vernon, Sally W. ; Fisher, Deborah A. ; Griffin, Joan ; Murdoch, Maureen. / Randomized trial showed requesting medical records with a survey produced a more representative sample than requesting separately. In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 2008 ; Vol. 61, No. 10. pp. 1028-1035.
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