Radiotherapy is effective for metastatic spinal cord compression in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer

D. Rades, S. E. Schild, J. Dunst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ovarian cancer patients developing metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) are extremely rare and account for only 0.4% of MSCC patients. Only very few case reports are available in the literature. This analysis evaluates seven ovarian cancer patients treated for MSCC with radiotherapy alone. Data of 1,852 MSCC patients irradiated between 1992 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Seven patients were identified with epithelial ovarian cancer. These seven patients were evaluated for functional outcome, ambulatory status, local control of MSCC, and survival. The patients received either short-course radiotherapy (1 × 8 Gy or 5 × 4 Gy, n = 2) or long-course radiotherapy (10 × 3 Gy, 15 × 2.5 Gy, or 20 × 2 Gy, n = 5). Improvement of motor function occurred in three of the seven patients, in three of the five patients after long-course radiotherapy, and none of the two patients after short-course radiotherapy. Two of the five nonambulatory patients regained the ability to walk after radiotherapy. No further deterioration of motor function was seen in another three of the seven patients, in two of the five patients after long-course radiotherapy, and one of the two patients after short-course radiotherapy. Deterioration occurred in one of the seven patients, in none of the five patients after long-course radiotherapy, and one of the two patients after short-course radiotherapy. Patients died after a median interval of 4 months (range 1-7 months) following radiotherapy. A recurrence of MSCC did not occur. Radiotherapy alone is effective in improving or maintaining motor function in MSCC patients with ovarian cancer and should be administered if decompressive surgery is not indicated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-265
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecological Cancer
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

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Spinal Cord Compression
Radiotherapy
Ovarian Neoplasms
Ovarian epithelial cancer

Keywords

  • Metastatic spinal cord compression
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Radiotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Radiotherapy is effective for metastatic spinal cord compression in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. / Rades, D.; Schild, S. E.; Dunst, J.

In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 263-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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