Racial/ethnic and regional differences in the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease in the United States

Yize R. Wang, Edward Vincent Loftus, Jr, John R. Cangemi, Michael F. Picco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The magnitude of racial/ethnic and regional differences in the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the United States remains largely unknown. Aims: To estimate differences in the prevalence of IBD by race/ethnicity and region. Methods: The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative survey of US households and medical conditions, was used. A multivariate logistic model was used in statistical analysis. Results: Among 202,468 individuals surveyed during 1996-2007, 316 were diagnosed with IBD (26 Blacks, 21 Hispanics, and 5 Asians). The prevalence of IBD was higher in Whites [Crohn's disease: 154; ulcerative colitis (UC): 89] than Blacks (Crohn's disease: 68; UC: 25), Hispanics (Crohn's disease: 15; UC: 35), and Asians (Crohn's: 45; UC: 40) (all p < 0.05, except for UC in Asians). The differences in Crohn's disease between Whites and minorities and the difference in UC between Whites and Blacks remained significant in multivariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, there was no regional difference in the prevalence of Crohn's disease, but the prevalence of UC was higher in the Northeast than the South (p < 0.05). Conclusions: There were significant racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of IBD in the USA. The underlying etiology of these differences warrants additional research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-25
Number of pages6
JournalDigestion
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Fingerprint

Ulcerative Colitis
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Crohn Disease
Hispanic Americans
Multivariate Analysis
Health Expenditures
Logistic Models
Research

Keywords

  • Crohn's disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Racial/ethnic and regional differences in the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease in the United States. / Wang, Yize R.; Loftus, Jr, Edward Vincent; Cangemi, John R.; Picco, Michael F.

In: Digestion, Vol. 88, No. 1, 07.2013, p. 20-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{29753b9035cc491ba4f53290682a41c3,
title = "Racial/ethnic and regional differences in the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease in the United States",
abstract = "Background: The magnitude of racial/ethnic and regional differences in the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the United States remains largely unknown. Aims: To estimate differences in the prevalence of IBD by race/ethnicity and region. Methods: The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative survey of US households and medical conditions, was used. A multivariate logistic model was used in statistical analysis. Results: Among 202,468 individuals surveyed during 1996-2007, 316 were diagnosed with IBD (26 Blacks, 21 Hispanics, and 5 Asians). The prevalence of IBD was higher in Whites [Crohn's disease: 154; ulcerative colitis (UC): 89] than Blacks (Crohn's disease: 68; UC: 25), Hispanics (Crohn's disease: 15; UC: 35), and Asians (Crohn's: 45; UC: 40) (all p < 0.05, except for UC in Asians). The differences in Crohn's disease between Whites and minorities and the difference in UC between Whites and Blacks remained significant in multivariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, there was no regional difference in the prevalence of Crohn's disease, but the prevalence of UC was higher in the Northeast than the South (p < 0.05). Conclusions: There were significant racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of IBD in the USA. The underlying etiology of these differences warrants additional research.",
keywords = "Crohn's disease, Inflammatory bowel disease, Ulcerative colitis",
author = "Wang, {Yize R.} and {Loftus, Jr}, {Edward Vincent} and Cangemi, {John R.} and Picco, {Michael F.}",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1159/000350759",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "88",
pages = "20--25",
journal = "Digestion",
issn = "0012-2823",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Racial/ethnic and regional differences in the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease in the United States

AU - Wang, Yize R.

AU - Loftus, Jr, Edward Vincent

AU - Cangemi, John R.

AU - Picco, Michael F.

PY - 2013/7

Y1 - 2013/7

N2 - Background: The magnitude of racial/ethnic and regional differences in the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the United States remains largely unknown. Aims: To estimate differences in the prevalence of IBD by race/ethnicity and region. Methods: The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative survey of US households and medical conditions, was used. A multivariate logistic model was used in statistical analysis. Results: Among 202,468 individuals surveyed during 1996-2007, 316 were diagnosed with IBD (26 Blacks, 21 Hispanics, and 5 Asians). The prevalence of IBD was higher in Whites [Crohn's disease: 154; ulcerative colitis (UC): 89] than Blacks (Crohn's disease: 68; UC: 25), Hispanics (Crohn's disease: 15; UC: 35), and Asians (Crohn's: 45; UC: 40) (all p < 0.05, except for UC in Asians). The differences in Crohn's disease between Whites and minorities and the difference in UC between Whites and Blacks remained significant in multivariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, there was no regional difference in the prevalence of Crohn's disease, but the prevalence of UC was higher in the Northeast than the South (p < 0.05). Conclusions: There were significant racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of IBD in the USA. The underlying etiology of these differences warrants additional research.

AB - Background: The magnitude of racial/ethnic and regional differences in the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the United States remains largely unknown. Aims: To estimate differences in the prevalence of IBD by race/ethnicity and region. Methods: The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative survey of US households and medical conditions, was used. A multivariate logistic model was used in statistical analysis. Results: Among 202,468 individuals surveyed during 1996-2007, 316 were diagnosed with IBD (26 Blacks, 21 Hispanics, and 5 Asians). The prevalence of IBD was higher in Whites [Crohn's disease: 154; ulcerative colitis (UC): 89] than Blacks (Crohn's disease: 68; UC: 25), Hispanics (Crohn's disease: 15; UC: 35), and Asians (Crohn's: 45; UC: 40) (all p < 0.05, except for UC in Asians). The differences in Crohn's disease between Whites and minorities and the difference in UC between Whites and Blacks remained significant in multivariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, there was no regional difference in the prevalence of Crohn's disease, but the prevalence of UC was higher in the Northeast than the South (p < 0.05). Conclusions: There were significant racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of IBD in the USA. The underlying etiology of these differences warrants additional research.

KW - Crohn's disease

KW - Inflammatory bowel disease

KW - Ulcerative colitis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879142411&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84879142411&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000350759

DO - 10.1159/000350759

M3 - Article

C2 - 23797316

AN - SCOPUS:84879142411

VL - 88

SP - 20

EP - 25

JO - Digestion

JF - Digestion

SN - 0012-2823

IS - 1

ER -