Racial and ethnic variations in the epidemiology of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma in the United States

Luciana McLean, Tushar Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/aims: Despite the global increase in the incidence of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, regional variations occur. To assess the potential contribution of racial/ethnic factors, we assessed the epidemiology of these cancers in different racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Methods: Disease prevalence, mortality and survival rates for different racial and ethnic groups were obtained from the surveillance, epidemiology and end results survey database. Results: The age-adjusted prevalence was highest for Hispanics (1.22 per 100000) and lowest for Blacks (0.3 per 100000). Age-adjusted mortality rates were higher for American Indian/Alaska Natives and Asian/Pacific Islanders compared with other groups. However, mortality rates increased by greater than 3.5% annual for all racial or ethnic groups except for American Indian/Pacific Islanders in whom mortality rates decreased by 0.2% annually. The increase in mortality rates was greatest for Hispanic women aged between 40 and 49 years. Prevalence and survival were significantly higher in Hispanic women in contrast to gender differences observed in other groups. Conclusions: Significant racial and ethnic variations occur in the epidemiology of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma within geographically defined regions in the United States These may reflect genetic, socioeconomic or cultural predispositions to cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1047-1053
Number of pages7
JournalLiver International
Volume26
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

Keywords

  • Biliary tract cancer
  • Hispanic
  • Liver cancer
  • Prevalence
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

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