Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

Demilade A. Adedinsewo, Ivan E. Porter, Richard O White, La Tonya J. Hickson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose of Review: The purpose of this article is to critically appraise and summarize recent literature addressing racial and ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease among adults with chronic kidney disease. Recent Findings: Despite advances in medical care, individuals with chronic kidney disease continue to bear a high burden of clinical and subclinical cardiovascular disease. Multiple racial and ethnic factors influence cardiovascular disease pathophysiology, burden, and clinical outcomes therein contributing to increased morbidity and mortality among racial and ethnic minority populations with chronic kidney disease. Summary: Racial differences in the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy, endothelial dysfunction, vascular calcification, and inflammation are observed in chronic kidney disease and contribute to increased morbidity and mortality. This review describes key pathophysiologic processes in addition to biologic and sociodemographic risk factors that impact observed cardiovascular disparities in racial and ethnic minority populations with chronic kidney disease. The review highlights factors impacting the relationship between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular risk including diabetes, dyslipidemia, apolipoprotein L1 gene variants, dialysis, and kidney transplantation as well as drivers of racial and ethnic disparities including structural racism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Cardiovascular Risk Reports
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Disparities
  • Ethnicity
  • Kidney disease
  • Race
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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