Quantitative characterization of brain β-amyloid using a joint PiB/FDG PET image histogram

Jon J. Camp, Dennis P. Hanson, David R. Holmes III, Bradley J. Kemp, Matthew L. Senjem, Melissa E Murray, Dennis W Dickson, Joseph E Parisi, Ronald Carl Petersen, Val Lowe, Richard A. Robb

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A complex analysis performed by spatial registration of PiB and MRI patient images in order to localize the PiB signal to specific cortical brain regions has been proven effective in identifying imaging characteristics associated with underlying Alzheimera's Disease (AD) and Lewy Body Disease (LBD) pathology. This paper presents an original method of image analysis and stratification of amyloid-related brain disease based on the global spatial correlation of PiB PET images with 18F-FDG PET images (without MR images) to categorize the PiB signal arising from the cortex. Rigid registration of PiB and 18F-FDG images is relatively straightforward, and in registration the 18F-FDG signal serves to identify the cortical region in which the PiB signal is relevant. Cortical grey matter demonstrates the highest levels of amyloid accumulation and therefore the greatest PiB signal related to amyloid pathology. The highest intensity voxels in the 18F-FDG image are attributed to the cortical grey matter. The correlation of the highest intensity PiB voxels with the highest 18F-FDG values indicates the presence of I-amyloid protein in the cortex in disease states, while correlation of the highest intensity PiB voxels with mid-range 18F-FDG values indicates only nonspecific binding in the white matter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
PublisherSPIE
Volume9035
ISBN (Print)9780819498281
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
EventMedical Imaging 2014: Computer-Aided Diagnosis - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 18 2014Feb 20 2014

Other

OtherMedical Imaging 2014: Computer-Aided Diagnosis
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period2/18/142/20/14

Fingerprint

Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Amyloid
histograms
brain
Brain
Joints
Pathology
cortexes
pathology
Magnetic resonance imaging
Image analysis
Amyloidogenic Proteins
Lewy Body Disease
Spatial Analysis
Brain Diseases
stratification
image analysis
Imaging techniques
proteins

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Joint histogram
  • Lewy body disease
  • PET imaging
  • PiB
  • β-amyloid plaques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Camp, J. J., Hanson, D. P., Holmes III, D. R., Kemp, B. J., Senjem, M. L., Murray, M. E., ... Robb, R. A. (2014). Quantitative characterization of brain β-amyloid using a joint PiB/FDG PET image histogram. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 9035). [90352A] SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2042880

Quantitative characterization of brain β-amyloid using a joint PiB/FDG PET image histogram. / Camp, Jon J.; Hanson, Dennis P.; Holmes III, David R.; Kemp, Bradley J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Murray, Melissa E; Dickson, Dennis W; Parisi, Joseph E; Petersen, Ronald Carl; Lowe, Val; Robb, Richard A.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 9035 SPIE, 2014. 90352A.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Camp, JJ, Hanson, DP, Holmes III, DR, Kemp, BJ, Senjem, ML, Murray, ME, Dickson, DW, Parisi, JE, Petersen, RC, Lowe, V & Robb, RA 2014, Quantitative characterization of brain β-amyloid using a joint PiB/FDG PET image histogram. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 9035, 90352A, SPIE, Medical Imaging 2014: Computer-Aided Diagnosis, San Diego, CA, United States, 2/18/14. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2042880
Camp JJ, Hanson DP, Holmes III DR, Kemp BJ, Senjem ML, Murray ME et al. Quantitative characterization of brain β-amyloid using a joint PiB/FDG PET image histogram. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 9035. SPIE. 2014. 90352A https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2042880
Camp, Jon J. ; Hanson, Dennis P. ; Holmes III, David R. ; Kemp, Bradley J. ; Senjem, Matthew L. ; Murray, Melissa E ; Dickson, Dennis W ; Parisi, Joseph E ; Petersen, Ronald Carl ; Lowe, Val ; Robb, Richard A. / Quantitative characterization of brain β-amyloid using a joint PiB/FDG PET image histogram. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 9035 SPIE, 2014.
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