Quantifying viscoelasticity of gelatin phantoms by measuring impulse response using compact optical sensors [Correspondence]

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tissue elastography measures tissue mechanical properties, which contain important physiological information and help medical diagnosis. Instead of tracking shear wave propagation inside tissue as do magnetic resonance elastography and ultrasound based techniques, this study focuses on monitoring the propagation of surface Raleigh waves stimulated by short impulses. The method is noncontact, noninvasive, and low cost and has a potential for clinical applications. A customized device designed to measure surface wave propagation is constructed based on a laser displacement sensor (LDS). Experiments are carried out on two porcine skin gelatin phantoms of different concentrations. For each phantom, the phase velocities of specific frequencies are extracted using a cross-spectrum method and then the material elasticity and viscosity are found by fitting the phase velocities with the Voigt's model. The results suggest that measuring viscoelasticity by monitoring the response to a surface impulse is an efficient method because of the richness of frequency content of impulse responses. The results are validated with a standard continuous wave (CW) method.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5507672
Pages (from-to)1696-1700
Number of pages5
JournalIEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control
Volume57
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

Fingerprint

viscoelasticity
gelatins
Viscoelasticity
Optical sensors
optical measuring instruments
Impulse response
impulses
Phase velocity
Tissue
phase velocity
Surface waves
Wave propagation
surface waves
wave propagation
costs
Monitoring
Shear waves
Magnetic resonance
S waves
continuous radiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Instrumentation

Cite this

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title = "Quantifying viscoelasticity of gelatin phantoms by measuring impulse response using compact optical sensors [Correspondence]",
abstract = "Tissue elastography measures tissue mechanical properties, which contain important physiological information and help medical diagnosis. Instead of tracking shear wave propagation inside tissue as do magnetic resonance elastography and ultrasound based techniques, this study focuses on monitoring the propagation of surface Raleigh waves stimulated by short impulses. The method is noncontact, noninvasive, and low cost and has a potential for clinical applications. A customized device designed to measure surface wave propagation is constructed based on a laser displacement sensor (LDS). Experiments are carried out on two porcine skin gelatin phantoms of different concentrations. For each phantom, the phase velocities of specific frequencies are extracted using a cross-spectrum method and then the material elasticity and viscosity are found by fitting the phase velocities with the Voigt's model. The results suggest that measuring viscoelasticity by monitoring the response to a surface impulse is an efficient method because of the richness of frequency content of impulse responses. The results are validated with a standard continuous wave (CW) method.",
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