Quantifying efficacy of chemotherapy of brain tumors with homogeneous and heterogeneous drug delivery

Kristin Swanson, Ellsworth C. Alvord, J. D. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gliomas are diffuse and invasive brain tumors with the nefarious ability to evade even seemingly draconian treatment measures. Here we introduce a simple mathematical model for drug delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to treat such a tumor. The model predicts that heterogeneity in drug delivery related to variability in vascular density throughout the brain results in an apparent tumor reduction based on imaging studies despite continual spread beyond the resolution of the imaging modality. We discuss a clinical example for which the model-predicted scenario is relevant. The analysis and results suggest an explanation for the clinical problem of the long-standing confounding observation of shrinkage of the lesion in certain areas of the brain with continued growth in other areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-237
Number of pages15
JournalActa Biotheoretica
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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chemotherapy
Brain Tumor
Drug Delivery
Chemotherapy
Drug delivery
Brain Neoplasms
tumor
drug therapy
Efficacy
brain
Tumors
Tumor
Brain
drug
Imaging
Drug Therapy
drugs
neoplasms
Confounding
Shrinkage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Quantifying efficacy of chemotherapy of brain tumors with homogeneous and heterogeneous drug delivery. / Swanson, Kristin; Alvord, Ellsworth C.; Murray, J. D.

In: Acta Biotheoretica, Vol. 50, No. 4, 2002, p. 223-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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