Purging metastases in lymphoid organs using a combination of antigen-nonspecific adoptive T cell therapy, oncolytic virotherapy and immunotherapy

Jian Qiao, Timothy Kottke, Candice Willmon, Feorillo Galivo, Phonphimon Wongthida, Rosa Maria Diaz, Jill Thompson, Pamela Ryno, Glen N. Barber, John Chester, Peter Selby, Kevin Harrington, Alan Melcher, Richard Geoffrey Vile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In many common cancers, dissemination of secondary tumors via the lymph nodes poses the most significant threat to the affected individual. Metastatic cells often reach the lymph nodes by mimicking the molecular mechanisms used by hematopoietic cells to traffic to peripheral lymphoid organs. Therefore, we exploited naive T cell trafficking in order to chaperone an oncolytic virus to lymphoid organs harboring metastatic cells. Metastatic burden was initially reduced by viral oncolysis and was then eradicated, as tumor cell killing in the lymph node and spleen generated protective antitumor immunity. Lymph node purging of tumor cells was possible even in virus-immune mice. Adoptive transfer of normal T cells loaded with oncolytic virus into individuals with cancer would be technically easy to implement both to reduce the distribution of metastases and to vaccinate the affected individual in situ against micrometastatic disease. As such, this adoptive transfer could have a great therapeutic impact, in the adjuvant setting, on many different cancer types.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-44
Number of pages8
JournalNature Medicine
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008

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Oncolytic Virotherapy
Purging
T-cells
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Viruses
Immunotherapy
Tumors
Neoplasm Metastasis
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
Lymph Nodes
Cells
Oncolytic Viruses
Neoplasms
Adoptive Transfer
Immunity
Spleen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Purging metastases in lymphoid organs using a combination of antigen-nonspecific adoptive T cell therapy, oncolytic virotherapy and immunotherapy. / Qiao, Jian; Kottke, Timothy; Willmon, Candice; Galivo, Feorillo; Wongthida, Phonphimon; Diaz, Rosa Maria; Thompson, Jill; Ryno, Pamela; Barber, Glen N.; Chester, John; Selby, Peter; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard Geoffrey.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 37-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Qiao, J, Kottke, T, Willmon, C, Galivo, F, Wongthida, P, Diaz, RM, Thompson, J, Ryno, P, Barber, GN, Chester, J, Selby, P, Harrington, K, Melcher, A & Vile, RG 2008, 'Purging metastases in lymphoid organs using a combination of antigen-nonspecific adoptive T cell therapy, oncolytic virotherapy and immunotherapy', Nature Medicine, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 37-44. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1681
Qiao, Jian ; Kottke, Timothy ; Willmon, Candice ; Galivo, Feorillo ; Wongthida, Phonphimon ; Diaz, Rosa Maria ; Thompson, Jill ; Ryno, Pamela ; Barber, Glen N. ; Chester, John ; Selby, Peter ; Harrington, Kevin ; Melcher, Alan ; Vile, Richard Geoffrey. / Purging metastases in lymphoid organs using a combination of antigen-nonspecific adoptive T cell therapy, oncolytic virotherapy and immunotherapy. In: Nature Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 37-44.
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