Pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma of MALT type as a cause of pulmonary amyloidosis

J. K. Lim, Martha Lacy, R. A. Kyle, Morie Gertz, P. J. Kurtin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Aim - To describe six patients with pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma in whom amyloid deposition was identified. Marginal zone lymphoma is a recently recognised type of low grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Methods - A computerised search was performed of all patients seen at the Mayo Clinic with a diagnosis of pulmonary amyloidosis. Six patients with pulmonary amyloidosis who had biopsy confirmed extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue type were identified. All were women, ranging in age from 45 to 85 years. Results - Five patients had amyloid deposition in conjunction with pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma at the time of the original diagnosis. One patient was referred for evaluation of localised pulmonary amyloidosis and was found to have coexisting pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma. Clinical presentation was limited to pulmonary symptoms (two of the six) or constitutional symptoms (two), or was asymptomatic (two). In all six cases, initial findings of nodular densities on screening chest roentgenograms led to further evaluation and eventual lobectomy; these findings included multiple pulmonary nodules (four), single nodule (one), and single nodule with diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates (one). Bone marrow was examined in five patients and was normal in all. Protein studies performed in four patients revealed no monoclonal protein. No patients had manifestations of systemic amyloidosis, such as renal, neurological, or cardiac involvement, at a median follow up of 50 months. Four of the six patients remain alive at a median of five years. Conclusions - Pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma may be found in association with localised amyloid deposition and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of localised pulmonary amyloidosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-646
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Pathology
Volume54
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 29 2001

Fingerprint

Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma
Amyloidosis
Lung
Lymphoma
Amyloid
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Multiple Pulmonary Nodules
Proteins
Differential Diagnosis
Thorax
Bone Marrow
Kidney
Biopsy

Keywords

  • Amyloidosis
  • Marginal zone lymphoma
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Pulmonary marginal zone lymphoma of MALT type as a cause of pulmonary amyloidosis. / Lim, J. K.; Lacy, Martha; Kyle, R. A.; Gertz, Morie; Kurtin, P. J.

In: Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 54, No. 8, 29.08.2001, p. 642-646.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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