Publication Rates of Abstracts Presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting

Heidi M. Egloff, Colin Patrick West, Amy T. Wang, Katie M. Lowe, Jithinraj Edakkanambeth Varayil, Thomas J. Beckman, Adam P. Sawatsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Abstracts accepted at scientific meetings are often not subsequently published. Data on publication rates are largely from subspecialty and surgical studies. Objective: The aims of this study were to 1) determine publication rates of abstracts presented at a general internal medicine meeting; 2) describe research activity among academic general internists; 3) identify factors associated with publication and with the impact factor of the journal of publication; and 4) evaluate for publication bias. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Participants: All scientific abstracts presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine 2009 Annual Meeting. Main Measures: Publication rates were determined by searching for full-text publications in MEDLINE. Data were abstracted regarding authors’ institution, research topic category, number of study sites, sample size, study design, statistical significance (p value and confidence interval) in abstract and publication, journal of publication, publication date, and journal impact factor. Key Results: Of the 578 abstracts analyzed, 274 (47.4%) were subsequently published as a full article in a peer-reviewed journal indexed in MEDLINE. In a multivariable model adjusting for institution site, research topic, number of study sites, study design, sample size, and abstract results, publication rates for academic general internists were highest in the areas of medical education (52.5%, OR 5.05, 95% CI 1.57–17.25, reference group Veterans Affairs (VA)-based research, publication rate 36.7%), mental health/substance use (67.7%, OR 4.16, 95% CI 1.39–13.06), and aging/geriatrics/end of life (65.7%, OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.15–9.94, p = 0.01 across topics). Publication rates were higher for multicenter studies than single-institution studies (52.4% vs. 40.4%, OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.10–2.52, p = 0.04 across categories). Randomized controlled trials had higher publication rates than other study designs (66.7% vs. 45.9%, OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.30–5.94, p = 0.03 across study designs). Studies with positive results did not predict higher publication rates than negative studies (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.6–1.31, p = 0.21). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that 47.4% of abstracts presented at a general internal medicine national conference were subsequently published in a peer-reviewed journal indexed in MEDLINE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 30 2017

Fingerprint

Publications
Journal Impact Factor
MEDLINE
Internal Medicine
Research
Sample Size
Publication Bias
Veterans
Medical Education
Geriatrics
Multicenter Studies
Mental Health
Cohort Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials
Retrospective Studies
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Egloff, H. M., West, C. P., Wang, A. T., Lowe, K. M., Edakkanambeth Varayil, J., Beckman, T. J., & Sawatsky, A. P. (Accepted/In press). Publication Rates of Abstracts Presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 1-6. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-017-3990-5

Publication Rates of Abstracts Presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting. / Egloff, Heidi M.; West, Colin Patrick; Wang, Amy T.; Lowe, Katie M.; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Beckman, Thomas J.; Sawatsky, Adam P.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, 30.01.2017, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Egloff, Heidi M. ; West, Colin Patrick ; Wang, Amy T. ; Lowe, Katie M. ; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj ; Beckman, Thomas J. ; Sawatsky, Adam P. / Publication Rates of Abstracts Presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting. In: Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2017 ; pp. 1-6.
@article{c6348188bac14cb5974032f27f79156a,
title = "Publication Rates of Abstracts Presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting",
abstract = "Background: Abstracts accepted at scientific meetings are often not subsequently published. Data on publication rates are largely from subspecialty and surgical studies. Objective: The aims of this study were to 1) determine publication rates of abstracts presented at a general internal medicine meeting; 2) describe research activity among academic general internists; 3) identify factors associated with publication and with the impact factor of the journal of publication; and 4) evaluate for publication bias. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Participants: All scientific abstracts presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine 2009 Annual Meeting. Main Measures: Publication rates were determined by searching for full-text publications in MEDLINE. Data were abstracted regarding authors’ institution, research topic category, number of study sites, sample size, study design, statistical significance (p value and confidence interval) in abstract and publication, journal of publication, publication date, and journal impact factor. Key Results: Of the 578 abstracts analyzed, 274 (47.4{\%}) were subsequently published as a full article in a peer-reviewed journal indexed in MEDLINE. In a multivariable model adjusting for institution site, research topic, number of study sites, study design, sample size, and abstract results, publication rates for academic general internists were highest in the areas of medical education (52.5{\%}, OR 5.05, 95{\%} CI 1.57–17.25, reference group Veterans Affairs (VA)-based research, publication rate 36.7{\%}), mental health/substance use (67.7{\%}, OR 4.16, 95{\%} CI 1.39–13.06), and aging/geriatrics/end of life (65.7{\%}, OR 3.31, 95{\%} CI 1.15–9.94, p = 0.01 across topics). Publication rates were higher for multicenter studies than single-institution studies (52.4{\%} vs. 40.4{\%}, OR 1.66, 95{\%} CI 1.10–2.52, p = 0.04 across categories). Randomized controlled trials had higher publication rates than other study designs (66.7{\%} vs. 45.9{\%}, OR 2.72, 95{\%} CI 1.30–5.94, p = 0.03 across study designs). Studies with positive results did not predict higher publication rates than negative studies (OR 0.89, 95{\%} CI 0.6–1.31, p = 0.21). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that 47.4{\%} of abstracts presented at a general internal medicine national conference were subsequently published in a peer-reviewed journal indexed in MEDLINE.",
author = "Egloff, {Heidi M.} and West, {Colin Patrick} and Wang, {Amy T.} and Lowe, {Katie M.} and {Edakkanambeth Varayil}, Jithinraj and Beckman, {Thomas J.} and Sawatsky, {Adam P.}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1007/s11606-017-3990-5",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--6",
journal = "Journal of General Internal Medicine",
issn = "0884-8734",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Publication Rates of Abstracts Presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting

AU - Egloff, Heidi M.

AU - West, Colin Patrick

AU - Wang, Amy T.

AU - Lowe, Katie M.

AU - Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj

AU - Beckman, Thomas J.

AU - Sawatsky, Adam P.

PY - 2017/1/30

Y1 - 2017/1/30

N2 - Background: Abstracts accepted at scientific meetings are often not subsequently published. Data on publication rates are largely from subspecialty and surgical studies. Objective: The aims of this study were to 1) determine publication rates of abstracts presented at a general internal medicine meeting; 2) describe research activity among academic general internists; 3) identify factors associated with publication and with the impact factor of the journal of publication; and 4) evaluate for publication bias. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Participants: All scientific abstracts presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine 2009 Annual Meeting. Main Measures: Publication rates were determined by searching for full-text publications in MEDLINE. Data were abstracted regarding authors’ institution, research topic category, number of study sites, sample size, study design, statistical significance (p value and confidence interval) in abstract and publication, journal of publication, publication date, and journal impact factor. Key Results: Of the 578 abstracts analyzed, 274 (47.4%) were subsequently published as a full article in a peer-reviewed journal indexed in MEDLINE. In a multivariable model adjusting for institution site, research topic, number of study sites, study design, sample size, and abstract results, publication rates for academic general internists were highest in the areas of medical education (52.5%, OR 5.05, 95% CI 1.57–17.25, reference group Veterans Affairs (VA)-based research, publication rate 36.7%), mental health/substance use (67.7%, OR 4.16, 95% CI 1.39–13.06), and aging/geriatrics/end of life (65.7%, OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.15–9.94, p = 0.01 across topics). Publication rates were higher for multicenter studies than single-institution studies (52.4% vs. 40.4%, OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.10–2.52, p = 0.04 across categories). Randomized controlled trials had higher publication rates than other study designs (66.7% vs. 45.9%, OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.30–5.94, p = 0.03 across study designs). Studies with positive results did not predict higher publication rates than negative studies (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.6–1.31, p = 0.21). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that 47.4% of abstracts presented at a general internal medicine national conference were subsequently published in a peer-reviewed journal indexed in MEDLINE.

AB - Background: Abstracts accepted at scientific meetings are often not subsequently published. Data on publication rates are largely from subspecialty and surgical studies. Objective: The aims of this study were to 1) determine publication rates of abstracts presented at a general internal medicine meeting; 2) describe research activity among academic general internists; 3) identify factors associated with publication and with the impact factor of the journal of publication; and 4) evaluate for publication bias. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Participants: All scientific abstracts presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine 2009 Annual Meeting. Main Measures: Publication rates were determined by searching for full-text publications in MEDLINE. Data were abstracted regarding authors’ institution, research topic category, number of study sites, sample size, study design, statistical significance (p value and confidence interval) in abstract and publication, journal of publication, publication date, and journal impact factor. Key Results: Of the 578 abstracts analyzed, 274 (47.4%) were subsequently published as a full article in a peer-reviewed journal indexed in MEDLINE. In a multivariable model adjusting for institution site, research topic, number of study sites, study design, sample size, and abstract results, publication rates for academic general internists were highest in the areas of medical education (52.5%, OR 5.05, 95% CI 1.57–17.25, reference group Veterans Affairs (VA)-based research, publication rate 36.7%), mental health/substance use (67.7%, OR 4.16, 95% CI 1.39–13.06), and aging/geriatrics/end of life (65.7%, OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.15–9.94, p = 0.01 across topics). Publication rates were higher for multicenter studies than single-institution studies (52.4% vs. 40.4%, OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.10–2.52, p = 0.04 across categories). Randomized controlled trials had higher publication rates than other study designs (66.7% vs. 45.9%, OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.30–5.94, p = 0.03 across study designs). Studies with positive results did not predict higher publication rates than negative studies (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.6–1.31, p = 0.21). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that 47.4% of abstracts presented at a general internal medicine national conference were subsequently published in a peer-reviewed journal indexed in MEDLINE.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85010952054&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85010952054&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11606-017-3990-5

DO - 10.1007/s11606-017-3990-5

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 6

JO - Journal of General Internal Medicine

JF - Journal of General Internal Medicine

SN - 0884-8734

ER -