Public and private self-consciousness and smoking behavior in head and neck cancer patients

K. A. Raichle, A. J. Christensen, Shawna L Ehlers, P. J. Moran, L. Karnell, G. Funk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients who continue to use tobacco following treatment for head and neck cancers are at a greater risk for cancer recurrence and earlier mortality. This study examined the unique effects of public and private self-consciousness and negative affect on smoking behavior in a sample of 40 patients with cancers of the head and neck. Measures of public and private self-consciousness and negative affect were administered and assessments of past and current smoking behavior were obtained. Only public self-consciousness was a significant predictor of continued smoking following oncologic treatment. Specifically, individuals with low levels of public self-consciousness were nearly 13 times more likely to continue smoking compared to those with relatively higher levels of public self-consciousness. This pattern is interpreted in the context of previous theorizing that suggests individuals high in public self-consciousness are more likely to discontinue habitual behavior that is perceived as socially undesirable or incorrect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-124
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume23
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Head and Neck Neoplasms
Consciousness
Smoking
Tobacco Use
Recurrence
Mortality
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Raichle, K. A., Christensen, A. J., Ehlers, S. L., Moran, P. J., Karnell, L., & Funk, G. (2001). Public and private self-consciousness and smoking behavior in head and neck cancer patients. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 23(2), 120-124.

Public and private self-consciousness and smoking behavior in head and neck cancer patients. / Raichle, K. A.; Christensen, A. J.; Ehlers, Shawna L; Moran, P. J.; Karnell, L.; Funk, G.

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 2, 2001, p. 120-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raichle, KA, Christensen, AJ, Ehlers, SL, Moran, PJ, Karnell, L & Funk, G 2001, 'Public and private self-consciousness and smoking behavior in head and neck cancer patients', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 120-124.
Raichle, K. A. ; Christensen, A. J. ; Ehlers, Shawna L ; Moran, P. J. ; Karnell, L. ; Funk, G. / Public and private self-consciousness and smoking behavior in head and neck cancer patients. In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 120-124.
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