Psychophysiologic responses of mechanically ventilated patients to music: a pilot study.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although mechanically ventilated patients experience numerous stressors, they have not been included in music therapy stress reduction and relaxation studies. OBJECTIVE: To examine selected psychophysiologic responses of mechanically ventilated patients to music. METHODS: A two-group experimental design with pretest, posttest, and repeated measures was used. Twenty mechanically ventilated patients were randomized to a music-listening group or a nonmusic (headphones only) group. Physiologic dependent measures--heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and airway pressure--were collected at timed intervals. Psychologic data were collected before and after intervention using the Profile of Mood States. RESULTS: Using repeated measures analysis of variance, results for heart rate and respiratory rate over time and over time between groups were significant. Between-group differences were significant for respiratory rate. Significant differences were found via t test for the music group's Profile of Mood States scores. No adverse cardiovascular responses were noted for either group. CONCLUSIONS: Data indicated that music listening decreased heart rate, respiratory rate, and Profile of Mood States scores, indicating relaxation and mood improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-238
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of critical care : an official publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Volume4
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Music
Respiratory Rate
Heart Rate
Music Therapy
Blood Pressure
Analysis of Variance
Research Design
Oxygen
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

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title = "Psychophysiologic responses of mechanically ventilated patients to music: a pilot study.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Although mechanically ventilated patients experience numerous stressors, they have not been included in music therapy stress reduction and relaxation studies. OBJECTIVE: To examine selected psychophysiologic responses of mechanically ventilated patients to music. METHODS: A two-group experimental design with pretest, posttest, and repeated measures was used. Twenty mechanically ventilated patients were randomized to a music-listening group or a nonmusic (headphones only) group. Physiologic dependent measures--heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and airway pressure--were collected at timed intervals. Psychologic data were collected before and after intervention using the Profile of Mood States. RESULTS: Using repeated measures analysis of variance, results for heart rate and respiratory rate over time and over time between groups were significant. Between-group differences were significant for respiratory rate. Significant differences were found via t test for the music group's Profile of Mood States scores. No adverse cardiovascular responses were noted for either group. CONCLUSIONS: Data indicated that music listening decreased heart rate, respiratory rate, and Profile of Mood States scores, indicating relaxation and mood improvement.",
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AU - Chlan, Linda

PY - 1995/5/1

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Although mechanically ventilated patients experience numerous stressors, they have not been included in music therapy stress reduction and relaxation studies. OBJECTIVE: To examine selected psychophysiologic responses of mechanically ventilated patients to music. METHODS: A two-group experimental design with pretest, posttest, and repeated measures was used. Twenty mechanically ventilated patients were randomized to a music-listening group or a nonmusic (headphones only) group. Physiologic dependent measures--heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and airway pressure--were collected at timed intervals. Psychologic data were collected before and after intervention using the Profile of Mood States. RESULTS: Using repeated measures analysis of variance, results for heart rate and respiratory rate over time and over time between groups were significant. Between-group differences were significant for respiratory rate. Significant differences were found via t test for the music group's Profile of Mood States scores. No adverse cardiovascular responses were noted for either group. CONCLUSIONS: Data indicated that music listening decreased heart rate, respiratory rate, and Profile of Mood States scores, indicating relaxation and mood improvement.

AB - BACKGROUND: Although mechanically ventilated patients experience numerous stressors, they have not been included in music therapy stress reduction and relaxation studies. OBJECTIVE: To examine selected psychophysiologic responses of mechanically ventilated patients to music. METHODS: A two-group experimental design with pretest, posttest, and repeated measures was used. Twenty mechanically ventilated patients were randomized to a music-listening group or a nonmusic (headphones only) group. Physiologic dependent measures--heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and airway pressure--were collected at timed intervals. Psychologic data were collected before and after intervention using the Profile of Mood States. RESULTS: Using repeated measures analysis of variance, results for heart rate and respiratory rate over time and over time between groups were significant. Between-group differences were significant for respiratory rate. Significant differences were found via t test for the music group's Profile of Mood States scores. No adverse cardiovascular responses were noted for either group. CONCLUSIONS: Data indicated that music listening decreased heart rate, respiratory rate, and Profile of Mood States scores, indicating relaxation and mood improvement.

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