Psychological distress in spouses of men treated for early-stage prostate carcinoma

David T Eton, Stephen J. Lepore, Vicki S. Helgeson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. The authors examined levels and predictors of psychological distress in the wives of men treated for early-stage prostate carcinoma (PCa). METHODS. Patients with PCa (N = 165) and spouses were interviewed to assess general and cancer-specific distress. Social and intrapersonal factors of spouses as well as clinical characteristics and quality of life of patients were assessed as potential predictors of spouses' distress. RESULTS. Spouses reported more cancer-specific distress than did patients (P < 0.001), but did not differ from patients in general distress. Several spouse-reported factors predicted higher spouses' distress, including less education (P < 0.005), worse marriage quality and less social support (Ps < 0.005), more negative social interaction with the patient (Ps < 0.001), lower self-esteem (Ps < 0.001), less positive coping (Ps < 0.005), searching for meaning (P < 0.001), not finding meaning (P < 0.005), and greater illness uncertainty (Ps < 0.001). Patients' bowel function and mental health also predicted greater spouses' distress (Ps < 0.005). CONCLUSIONS. The findings indicated that overall distress in spouses of early-stage patients with PCa was modest, and it was more likely to be predicted by psychosocial than medical factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2412-2418
Number of pages7
JournalCancer
Volume103
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spouses
Prostate
Psychology
Carcinoma
Interpersonal Relations
Marriage
Self Concept
Social Support
Uncertainty
Neoplasms
Mental Health
Quality of Life
Education

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Distress
  • Partners
  • Personality
  • Prostate carcinoma
  • Quality of life
  • Social environment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Psychological distress in spouses of men treated for early-stage prostate carcinoma. / Eton, David T; Lepore, Stephen J.; Helgeson, Vicki S.

In: Cancer, Vol. 103, No. 11, 01.06.2005, p. 2412-2418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eton, David T ; Lepore, Stephen J. ; Helgeson, Vicki S. / Psychological distress in spouses of men treated for early-stage prostate carcinoma. In: Cancer. 2005 ; Vol. 103, No. 11. pp. 2412-2418.
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