Psychiatric disorders and childhood abuse in the irritable bowel syndrome

N. J. Talley, K. G. Kramlinger, M. Caroline Burton, L. J. Colwell, A. R. Zinsmeister

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We aimed to determine whether psychiatric disorders and psychological symptoms are associated with the irritable bowel syndrome, and whether childhood sexual abuse is reported more often by patients with irritable bowel syndrome, as these issues continue to be controversial. Design: Prospectively, 32 symptomatic married outpatients with irritable bowel syndrome completed selected portions of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R psychiatric diagnoses, a standardized interview for childhood abuse, and a series of self-report psychological symptom inventories. Controls comprised 20 currently symptomatic married outpatients who had undergone a partial colectomy or ileectomy for organic disease, the spouses of the patients with irritable bowel syndrome, and the spouses of the organic disease controls. Results: Current psychiatric disorders were reported significantly more frequently by patients with irritable bowel syndrome compared with controls, although 69% of these patients were not affected. Childhood abuse was reported more frequently by patients with irritable bowel syndrome, but after adjusting for age and gender, a significant association with diagnostic group was not detected. However, psychiatric disorders were significantly more frequent in those with a history of childhood abuse. Self-report psychological symptom inventories did not discriminate between patients with the irritable bowel syndrome and controls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-654
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume5
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Psychiatry
Psychology
Spouses
Self Report
Outpatients
Interviews
Equipment and Supplies
Colectomy
Sex Offenses
Mental Disorders
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

Keywords

  • Abuse
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Functional bowel disorders
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Panic disorder
  • Psychiatric diagnoses
  • Somatoform disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Talley, N. J., Kramlinger, K. G., Burton, M. C., Colwell, L. J., & Zinsmeister, A. R. (1993). Psychiatric disorders and childhood abuse in the irritable bowel syndrome. European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 5(8), 647-654.

Psychiatric disorders and childhood abuse in the irritable bowel syndrome. / Talley, N. J.; Kramlinger, K. G.; Burton, M. Caroline; Colwell, L. J.; Zinsmeister, A. R.

In: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 5, No. 8, 1993, p. 647-654.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Talley, NJ, Kramlinger, KG, Burton, MC, Colwell, LJ & Zinsmeister, AR 1993, 'Psychiatric disorders and childhood abuse in the irritable bowel syndrome', European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 5, no. 8, pp. 647-654.
Talley, N. J. ; Kramlinger, K. G. ; Burton, M. Caroline ; Colwell, L. J. ; Zinsmeister, A. R. / Psychiatric disorders and childhood abuse in the irritable bowel syndrome. In: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 1993 ; Vol. 5, No. 8. pp. 647-654.
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