Pseudotyping lentiviral vectors with the wild-type measles virus glycoproteins improves titer and selectivity

S. Funke, I. C. Schneider, S. Glaser, M. D. Mühlebach, T. Moritz, Roberto Cattaneo, K. Cichutek, C. J. Buchholz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We pseudotyped HIV-1 vectors with cytoplasmic tail-truncated envelope glycoproteins of a wild-type (WT) measles virus (MV). The particles entered the lymphatic cells exclusively through the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM, CD150), whereas particles pseudotyped with the MV vaccine strain glycoproteins also recognized the ubiquitous membrane cofactor protein (CD46) as receptor and had less specific cell entry. MVWT-HIV vectors reached titers of 108 t.u. ml-1, which were up to 10-fold higher than those of MVVac-HIV vectors, and discriminated between SLAM-positive and SLAM-negative cells, also in mixed cell cultures. As these vectors transduce primary human cells more efficiently than vesicular stomatitis virus-G pseudotyped vectors do, they are promising candidates for gene transfer to human lymphocytes and certain epithelial cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)700-705
Number of pages6
JournalGene Therapy
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Measles virus
Glycoproteins
CD46 Antigens
HIV
Measles Vaccine
Vesicular Stomatitis
Lymphocyte Activation
Tail
HIV-1
Cell Culture Techniques
Epithelial Cells
Lymphocytes
Viruses
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Funke, S., Schneider, I. C., Glaser, S., Mühlebach, M. D., Moritz, T., Cattaneo, R., ... Buchholz, C. J. (2009). Pseudotyping lentiviral vectors with the wild-type measles virus glycoproteins improves titer and selectivity. Gene Therapy, 16(5), 700-705. https://doi.org/10.1038/gt.2009.11

Pseudotyping lentiviral vectors with the wild-type measles virus glycoproteins improves titer and selectivity. / Funke, S.; Schneider, I. C.; Glaser, S.; Mühlebach, M. D.; Moritz, T.; Cattaneo, Roberto; Cichutek, K.; Buchholz, C. J.

In: Gene Therapy, Vol. 16, No. 5, 2009, p. 700-705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Funke, S, Schneider, IC, Glaser, S, Mühlebach, MD, Moritz, T, Cattaneo, R, Cichutek, K & Buchholz, CJ 2009, 'Pseudotyping lentiviral vectors with the wild-type measles virus glycoproteins improves titer and selectivity', Gene Therapy, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 700-705. https://doi.org/10.1038/gt.2009.11
Funke, S. ; Schneider, I. C. ; Glaser, S. ; Mühlebach, M. D. ; Moritz, T. ; Cattaneo, Roberto ; Cichutek, K. ; Buchholz, C. J. / Pseudotyping lentiviral vectors with the wild-type measles virus glycoproteins improves titer and selectivity. In: Gene Therapy. 2009 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 700-705.
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