Protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients

Raj D. Sheth, Joseph F. Drazkowski, Joseph I. Sirven, Barry E. Gidal, Bruce P. Hermann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ictal confusion, particularly if protracted, often presents a diagnostic challenge. Objectives: To define protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients and to characterize its features and outcome. Design: Case series. Setting: Neurology outpatient and emergency departments at 2 tertiary care centers. Patients: Consecutive series of 22 ambulatory patients with acute ictal confusion. Main Outcome Measures: Duration of ictal confusion was correlated with age and lesions noted on cerebral images and videoelectroencephalographic studies. Results: The ictal basis underlying confusion was not recognized for up to 5 days in 22 patients (mean±SD age, 70±8.5 years). Twenty patients had partial complex status epilepticus, and 2 patients had newly diagnosed primary generalized status epilepticus. Motor movements were not present in either group, although reduced mood states and ictal neglect were noted in some patients. Fifteen patients had previous episodes (2-10) of protracted ictal confusion. Once identified, treatment reversed confusion, and eventually patients were discharged to home, although a few patients sustained persistent reduction in baseline cognition. Conclusions: Protracted ictal confusion is often not considered in the ambulatory elderly patient, with resulting delay in diagnosis. Electroencephalographic and videoelectroencephalographic studies performed while the patient is experiencing symptoms are crucial to early diagnosis and timely management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)529-532
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume63
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Fingerprint

Confusion
Stroke
Status Epilepticus
Neurology
Tertiary Care Centers
Cognition
Hospital Emergency Service
Early Diagnosis
Outpatients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Sheth, R. D., Drazkowski, J. F., Sirven, J. I., Gidal, B. E., & Hermann, B. P. (2006). Protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients. Archives of Neurology, 63(4), 529-532. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneur.63.4.529

Protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients. / Sheth, Raj D.; Drazkowski, Joseph F.; Sirven, Joseph I.; Gidal, Barry E.; Hermann, Bruce P.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 63, No. 4, 04.2006, p. 529-532.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sheth, RD, Drazkowski, JF, Sirven, JI, Gidal, BE & Hermann, BP 2006, 'Protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients', Archives of Neurology, vol. 63, no. 4, pp. 529-532. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneur.63.4.529
Sheth RD, Drazkowski JF, Sirven JI, Gidal BE, Hermann BP. Protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients. Archives of Neurology. 2006 Apr;63(4):529-532. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneur.63.4.529
Sheth, Raj D. ; Drazkowski, Joseph F. ; Sirven, Joseph I. ; Gidal, Barry E. ; Hermann, Bruce P. / Protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients. In: Archives of Neurology. 2006 ; Vol. 63, No. 4. pp. 529-532.
@article{9a4b2ab2d201492e9d0489ce965fccdf,
title = "Protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients",
abstract = "Background: Ictal confusion, particularly if protracted, often presents a diagnostic challenge. Objectives: To define protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients and to characterize its features and outcome. Design: Case series. Setting: Neurology outpatient and emergency departments at 2 tertiary care centers. Patients: Consecutive series of 22 ambulatory patients with acute ictal confusion. Main Outcome Measures: Duration of ictal confusion was correlated with age and lesions noted on cerebral images and videoelectroencephalographic studies. Results: The ictal basis underlying confusion was not recognized for up to 5 days in 22 patients (mean±SD age, 70±8.5 years). Twenty patients had partial complex status epilepticus, and 2 patients had newly diagnosed primary generalized status epilepticus. Motor movements were not present in either group, although reduced mood states and ictal neglect were noted in some patients. Fifteen patients had previous episodes (2-10) of protracted ictal confusion. Once identified, treatment reversed confusion, and eventually patients were discharged to home, although a few patients sustained persistent reduction in baseline cognition. Conclusions: Protracted ictal confusion is often not considered in the ambulatory elderly patient, with resulting delay in diagnosis. Electroencephalographic and videoelectroencephalographic studies performed while the patient is experiencing symptoms are crucial to early diagnosis and timely management.",
author = "Sheth, {Raj D.} and Drazkowski, {Joseph F.} and Sirven, {Joseph I.} and Gidal, {Barry E.} and Hermann, {Bruce P.}",
year = "2006",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1001/archneur.63.4.529",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
pages = "529--532",
journal = "Archives of Neurology",
issn = "0003-9942",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients

AU - Sheth, Raj D.

AU - Drazkowski, Joseph F.

AU - Sirven, Joseph I.

AU - Gidal, Barry E.

AU - Hermann, Bruce P.

PY - 2006/4

Y1 - 2006/4

N2 - Background: Ictal confusion, particularly if protracted, often presents a diagnostic challenge. Objectives: To define protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients and to characterize its features and outcome. Design: Case series. Setting: Neurology outpatient and emergency departments at 2 tertiary care centers. Patients: Consecutive series of 22 ambulatory patients with acute ictal confusion. Main Outcome Measures: Duration of ictal confusion was correlated with age and lesions noted on cerebral images and videoelectroencephalographic studies. Results: The ictal basis underlying confusion was not recognized for up to 5 days in 22 patients (mean±SD age, 70±8.5 years). Twenty patients had partial complex status epilepticus, and 2 patients had newly diagnosed primary generalized status epilepticus. Motor movements were not present in either group, although reduced mood states and ictal neglect were noted in some patients. Fifteen patients had previous episodes (2-10) of protracted ictal confusion. Once identified, treatment reversed confusion, and eventually patients were discharged to home, although a few patients sustained persistent reduction in baseline cognition. Conclusions: Protracted ictal confusion is often not considered in the ambulatory elderly patient, with resulting delay in diagnosis. Electroencephalographic and videoelectroencephalographic studies performed while the patient is experiencing symptoms are crucial to early diagnosis and timely management.

AB - Background: Ictal confusion, particularly if protracted, often presents a diagnostic challenge. Objectives: To define protracted ictal confusion in elderly patients and to characterize its features and outcome. Design: Case series. Setting: Neurology outpatient and emergency departments at 2 tertiary care centers. Patients: Consecutive series of 22 ambulatory patients with acute ictal confusion. Main Outcome Measures: Duration of ictal confusion was correlated with age and lesions noted on cerebral images and videoelectroencephalographic studies. Results: The ictal basis underlying confusion was not recognized for up to 5 days in 22 patients (mean±SD age, 70±8.5 years). Twenty patients had partial complex status epilepticus, and 2 patients had newly diagnosed primary generalized status epilepticus. Motor movements were not present in either group, although reduced mood states and ictal neglect were noted in some patients. Fifteen patients had previous episodes (2-10) of protracted ictal confusion. Once identified, treatment reversed confusion, and eventually patients were discharged to home, although a few patients sustained persistent reduction in baseline cognition. Conclusions: Protracted ictal confusion is often not considered in the ambulatory elderly patient, with resulting delay in diagnosis. Electroencephalographic and videoelectroencephalographic studies performed while the patient is experiencing symptoms are crucial to early diagnosis and timely management.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645733119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645733119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/archneur.63.4.529

DO - 10.1001/archneur.63.4.529

M3 - Article

C2 - 16606764

AN - SCOPUS:33645733119

VL - 63

SP - 529

EP - 532

JO - Archives of Neurology

JF - Archives of Neurology

SN - 0003-9942

IS - 4

ER -