Proteomic analysis of aneurysm healing mechanism after coil embolization: Comparison of dense packing with loose packing

R. Kadirvel, Y. H. Ding, D. Dai, D. A. Lewis, David F. Kallmes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In clinical practice, durability of occlusion following coil embolization is superior in densely packed, compared with loosely packed, aneurysms. In a rabbit model, we probed, by using proteomics tools, the biologic mechanisms associated with densely packed and completely occluded aneurysms, compared with loosely packed and incompletely occluded aneurysms, to explore the biologic mechanisms of intra-aneurysmal healing following embolization. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Elastase-induced, saccular aneurysms were created in 24 rabbits. Aneurysms were allowed to mature, after which aneurysms were either densely (packing attenuation >25%) or loosely (packing attenuation <20%) packed with platinum coils by endovascular means. After 2 weeks (n = 6 for both groups) and 4 weeks (n = 6 for both groups) of implantation, aneurysm samples harboring coils were harvested. Soluble proteins were extracted from the necks and domes of aneurysms, and proteins were studied using proteomics and bioinformatics tools. RESULTS: In dome tissue, 128 proteins at 2 weeks, and 8 proteins at 4 weeks, were differentially expressed in densely packed, compared with loosely packed, aneurysms. In the neck tissue, 2 proteins at 4 weeks were differentially expressed in densely packed aneurysms. Specific pathway analysis revealed that compared with loosely packed aneurysms, densely packed aneurysms were associated with up-regulation of cell-to-cell signaling and cell adhesion at 2 weeks. Conversely, at 4 weeks, densely packed aneurysms showed a decrease in the expression of structural proteins compared with loosely packed aneurysms. CONCLUSIONS: These findings may focus efforts on specific targets aimed at improving the long-term healing of intracranial, saccular aneurysms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1177-1181
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

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