Protein-elongating mutations in MYH11 are implicated in a dominantly inherited smooth muscle dysmotility syndrome with severe esophageal, gastric, and intestinal disease

Melissa A. Gilbert, Laura Schultz-Rogers, Ramakrishnan Rajagopalan, Christopher M. Grochowski, Benjamin J. Wilkins, Sawona Biswas, Laura K. Conlin, Kristin N. Fiorino, Radhika Dhamija, Michael A. Pack, Eric W. Klee, David A. Piccoli, Nancy B. Spinner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gastrointestinal motility disorders include a spectrum of mild to severe clinical phenotypes that are caused by smooth muscle dysfunction. We investigated the genetic etiology of severe esophageal, gastric, and colonic dysmotility in two unrelated families with autosomal dominant disease presentation. Using exome sequencing, we identified a 2 base pair insertion at the end of the myosin heavy chain 11 (MYH11) gene in all affected members of Family 1 [NM_001040113:c.5819_5820insCA(p.Gln1941Asnfs*91)] and a 1 base pair deletion at the same genetic locus in Proband 2 [NM_001040113:c.5819del(p.Pro1940Hisfs*91)]. Both variants are predicted to result in a similarly elongated protein product. Heterozygous dominant negative MYH11 pathogenic variants have been associated with thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection while biallelic null alleles have been associated with megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome. This report highlights heterozygous protein-elongating MYH11 variants affecting the SM2 isoforms of MYH11 as a cause for severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, and we hypothesize that the mechanistic pathogenesis of this disease, dominant hypercontractile loss-of-function, is distinct from those implicated in other diseases involving MYH11 dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)973-982
Number of pages10
JournalHuman mutation
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

Keywords

  • dysmotility
  • gastroparesis
  • hiatal hernia
  • MYH11
  • pseudo-obstruction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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