Prospective analysis of complications 30 days after outpatient colonoscopy

Richard Zubarik, David E. Fleischer, Chris Mastropietro, Jennifer Lopez, John Carroll, Stanley Benjamin, Glenn Eisen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

132 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Our objective was to (1) determine whether more complications are reported by patients 30 days after outpatient colonoscopy than are discussed at our monthly morbidity and mortality conferences, (2) identify complications resulting in visits to the emergency department or physician's office or leading to hospitalization, and (3) assess which factors put patients at highest risk. A secondary goal was to determine the rate of work lost after outpatient colonoscopy. Methods: Trained interviewers performed standardized telephone interviews of consecutive outpatients undergoing colonoscopy at Georgetown University Hospital over a 1-year period. Results: One thousand one hundred ninety-six patients were contacted 30 days after outpatient colonoscopy and participated in our study. Twenty patients had complications that required a visit to an emergency department or physician. Ninety percent of these cases (18) were detected at 30 days, but 15% (3) were discussed at morbidity and mortality conferences. All seven complications that necessitated hospitalization were identified at 30 days, but only two were discussed at our morbidity and mortality conference. The most common complications reported by patients were abdominal discomfort (5.4%) and rectal bleeding (2.1%). Conclusion: More complications are detected by means of contacting patients 30 days after outpatient colonoscopy than are discussed at our morbidity and mortality conferences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-328
Number of pages7
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Colonoscopy
Outpatients
Morbidity
Mortality
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Interviews
Physicians' Offices
Hemorrhage
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Zubarik, R., Fleischer, D. E., Mastropietro, C., Lopez, J., Carroll, J., Benjamin, S., & Eisen, G. (1999). Prospective analysis of complications 30 days after outpatient colonoscopy. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 50(3), 322-328. https://doi.org/10.1053/ge.1999.v50.97111

Prospective analysis of complications 30 days after outpatient colonoscopy. / Zubarik, Richard; Fleischer, David E.; Mastropietro, Chris; Lopez, Jennifer; Carroll, John; Benjamin, Stanley; Eisen, Glenn.

In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol. 50, No. 3, 1999, p. 322-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zubarik, R, Fleischer, DE, Mastropietro, C, Lopez, J, Carroll, J, Benjamin, S & Eisen, G 1999, 'Prospective analysis of complications 30 days after outpatient colonoscopy', Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 322-328. https://doi.org/10.1053/ge.1999.v50.97111
Zubarik R, Fleischer DE, Mastropietro C, Lopez J, Carroll J, Benjamin S et al. Prospective analysis of complications 30 days after outpatient colonoscopy. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 1999;50(3):322-328. https://doi.org/10.1053/ge.1999.v50.97111
Zubarik, Richard ; Fleischer, David E. ; Mastropietro, Chris ; Lopez, Jennifer ; Carroll, John ; Benjamin, Stanley ; Eisen, Glenn. / Prospective analysis of complications 30 days after outpatient colonoscopy. In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 1999 ; Vol. 50, No. 3. pp. 322-328.
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