Propagation of mouse and human T cells with defined antigen specificity and function.

Peter A Cohen, D. H. Fowler, H. Kim, R. L. White, B. J. Czerniecki, C. Carter, R. E. Gress, S. A. Rosenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Difficulties maintaining fully functional CD4+ T cells in culture have historically limited the study of their role in tumour rejection as well as other clinical applications. As the therapeutic value of current antitumour CD8+ T cell adoptive therapy becomes better defined, a strong impetus exists to determine optimal conditions for culturing antitumour CD4+ T cells. Our goal is to promote broadly polyclonal, antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses of either Th1 or Th2 character for use in antitumour therapy or allograft facilitation, respectively. Similar obstacles exist in murine and human cultures: (1) during even brief periods of culture CD4+ T cells develop high 'background' reactivity to class II-positive antigen-presenting cells; (2) maintenance of antigen specificity as evidenced by cytokine secretion and short-term proliferation assays is insufficient to ensure bulk numerical expansion; (3) Th1-type CD4+ T cells often lose their potential for antigen-specific secretion of interleukin 2 on re-stimulation (though remain inducible by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate/ionomycin); (4) during prolonged culture selection pressure favours CD4+ subpopulations that recognize artifactual antigens such as culture medium proteins; (5) even with optimal culture conditions, cultured CD4+ T cells may function differently in vivo to uncultured CD4+ T cells. We have devised various strategies to surmount these obstacles by use of selected cytokines, antigen-presenting cells and timely culture manoeuvres.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-193
Number of pages15
JournalCiba Foundation symposium
Volume187
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Cell Culture Techniques
Cytokines
CD4 Antigens
Ionomycin
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II
Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Interleukin-2
Allografts
Culture Media
Maintenance
Pressure
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cohen, P. A., Fowler, D. H., Kim, H., White, R. L., Czerniecki, B. J., Carter, C., ... Rosenberg, S. A. (1994). Propagation of mouse and human T cells with defined antigen specificity and function. Ciba Foundation symposium, 187, 179-193.

Propagation of mouse and human T cells with defined antigen specificity and function. / Cohen, Peter A; Fowler, D. H.; Kim, H.; White, R. L.; Czerniecki, B. J.; Carter, C.; Gress, R. E.; Rosenberg, S. A.

In: Ciba Foundation symposium, Vol. 187, 1994, p. 179-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cohen, PA, Fowler, DH, Kim, H, White, RL, Czerniecki, BJ, Carter, C, Gress, RE & Rosenberg, SA 1994, 'Propagation of mouse and human T cells with defined antigen specificity and function.', Ciba Foundation symposium, vol. 187, pp. 179-193.
Cohen PA, Fowler DH, Kim H, White RL, Czerniecki BJ, Carter C et al. Propagation of mouse and human T cells with defined antigen specificity and function. Ciba Foundation symposium. 1994;187:179-193.
Cohen, Peter A ; Fowler, D. H. ; Kim, H. ; White, R. L. ; Czerniecki, B. J. ; Carter, C. ; Gress, R. E. ; Rosenberg, S. A. / Propagation of mouse and human T cells with defined antigen specificity and function. In: Ciba Foundation symposium. 1994 ; Vol. 187. pp. 179-193.
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