Progressive hypertension in a patient with "incidental" renal artery stenosis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Taken together, this man's history illustrates one prone to atherosclerotic disease affecting multiple vascular beds at a relatively young age. Renal artery lesions were identified at a time before they produced significant hypertension or renal dysfunction. They were followed as "incidental" renal artery stenosis. Whether screening for RAS should be considered routinely as part of angiographic procedures cannot be determined with the data available today. Forewarning of the presence of high-grade renal artery lesions in this individual allowed prompt intervention 2 years later when arterial hypertension progressed rapidly and aggravated symptoms of cardiac ischemia. Awareness of the time sequence and potential for progression of both anatomic and clinical manifestations of renal artery disease is important for clinicians caring for such patients, particularly during an era of rapidly changing imaging, medical therapy, and interventional techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)595-600
Number of pages6
JournalHypertension
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2002

Fingerprint

Renal Artery Obstruction
Renal Artery
Hypertension
Renal Hypertension
Diagnostic Imaging
Blood Vessels
Ischemia
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Angioplasty
  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme
  • Hypertension, renovascular
  • Renal artery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Progressive hypertension in a patient with "incidental" renal artery stenosis. / Textor, Stephen C.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 40, No. 5, 01.11.2002, p. 595-600.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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