Progressive extensive osteoma cutis associated with dysmorphic features: A new syndrome? Case report and review of the literature

M. D P Davis, M. R. Pittelkow, Noralane Morey Lindor, C. E. Lundstrom, L. A. Fitzpatrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteoma cutis, also called cutaneous ossification, refers to the rare occurrence of bone in the skin. It may be primary, occurring in normal skin, or secondary, occurring in disrupted skin tissue. A 42-year-old white woman presented with long-standing progressive primary osteoma cutis involving her head and neck, trunk and extremities. She had craniofacial dysmorphism with mid-face hypoplasia, including saddle nose deformity, mild to moderate generalized joint hypermobility, extensive paravertebral ossification, and disc space calcification. The differential diagnosis for this entity is presented. This phenotype may be a previously undescribed syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1075-1080
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Dermatology
Volume146
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Skin
Joint Instability
Nose
Osteogenesis
Differential Diagnosis
Neck
Extremities
Head
Phenotype
Bone and Bones
Progressive Osseous Heteroplasia

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Osteoma cutis
  • Skin
  • Syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Progressive extensive osteoma cutis associated with dysmorphic features : A new syndrome? Case report and review of the literature. / Davis, M. D P; Pittelkow, M. R.; Lindor, Noralane Morey; Lundstrom, C. E.; Fitzpatrick, L. A.

In: British Journal of Dermatology, Vol. 146, No. 6, 2002, p. 1075-1080.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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