Prognostic value of radiographically defined extranodal extension in human papillomavirus-associated locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma

Sibo Tian, Matthew J. Ferris, Jeffrey M. Switchenko, Kelly R. Magliocca, Richard J. Cassidy, Jaymin Jhaveri, Ashley H. Aiken, Kristen L. Baugnon, Patricia A. Hudgins, Ayse T.K. Kendi, Mihir R. Patel, Nabil F. Saba, Walter J. Curran, Jonathan J. Beitler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Pathologic extranodal extension (ENE) has traditionally guided the management of head and neck cancers. The prognostic value of radiographic ENE (rENE) in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HPV + OPX) is uncertain. Methods: Patients with HPV + OPX with adequate pretreatment radiographic nodal evaluation from a single institution were analyzed. rENE status was determined by neuroradiologists' at time of diagnosis. Distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS), and locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to assess the impact of rENE on survival endpoints. Results: Hundred sixty-eight patients with OPX + squamous cell carcinomas diagnosed between April 2008 and December 2014 were included for analysis with median follow-up of 3.3 years. Eighty-eight percent of patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy. rENE was not prognostic; its presence in patients with HPV + OPX did not significantly impact OS, LRFS, or DMFS. Conclusions: In patients with HPV + OPX, rENE was not significantly associated with OS, LRFS, or DMFS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3056-3063
Number of pages8
JournalHead and Neck
Volume41
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Keywords

  • ENE
  • HPV
  • extranodal extension
  • oropharynx cancer
  • p16

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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